Processing old C-41 film

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by latinbob, Apr 8, 2008.

  1. latinbob

    latinbob Member

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    I have a friend who has a bunch of film he shot over 10 years ago that he never got developed. He asked me if I wanted to try to develop it. I have developed C-41 and E-6 at home without an problems using the Tetenal kits.

    Anybody have any experience with older film that was exposed but never developed? Any advice would be appreciated!

    Bob
     
  2. Cruzingoose

    Cruzingoose Member

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    Just Do It

    Really. 10 years is nothing unless they were stored in the glovebox of a car or on the heater. Try one at your regular process. If it looks acceptable, do the rest the same way, If they are weak, add another 50% time to the developer. This should get you acceptable prints.
     
  3. Akki14

    Akki14 Member

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    I've developed c-41 that turned out to be from the 70s or so. Horrible colourshift that might not be able to be corrected in darkroom but you can somewhat get a result in d***** trickery with varying the colour balance. Didn't change anything about the directions, just followed as normal. The film turned out looking a bit freaky when it came out of the tank - bright semi-opaque blue on one side and bright semi-opaque yellow on the other! But it did dry down to a more normal looking piece of film afterwards. Just warning you so you don't freak out if you get this. I think PhotoEngineer commented that the strange colours are due to the dye layers not being fully developed out or something like that.
     
  4. latinbob

    latinbob Member

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    Thanks for the feedback. I'll just give it a try at normal and see what I get!

    Bob
     
  5. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

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    Wouldn't push-processing the film also increase the density of the fog negating any of the benefits of a push?
     
  6. latinbob

    latinbob Member

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    Parts of the collection may be worse than others. He handed me a bag today with the film in it. Most are 35mm canisters of color, but two are 127 roll film. He thinks those two are more than 30 years old. I haven't looked carefully, but I'm almost sure those are B&W films. IT should be interesting if I get anything.

    Bob
     
  7. Akki14

    Akki14 Member

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    If they're rolled nicely, not squishy or offcentre, the 127 should be fine. I've developed 1970s B&W 127 too. Just chucked it in Diafine (since it will develop to completion. No worry in my mind that I might have underdeveloped it then) and it came out pretty good considering it looked like the photographer wasn't that great at taking pictures.