Processing Ready Loads; Static

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by jeroldharter, Apr 2, 2006.

  1. jeroldharter

    jeroldharter Member

    Messages:
    1,954
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2005
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    I am in the midst of processing Kodak Tmax 100 Readiloads for the first time. I think I figured out how to disassemble them without too much problem. I notice that when I pull off the cardboard sleeve, a brief green static light occurs right at the end when the cardboard sleeve passed over the plastic piece. I did not notice any fogging with the first batch but I haven't printed them. I try to go slowly, gently, etc. but it always happens.

    Should I worry about this? Am I doing it wrong? Thanks.
     
  2. darr

    darr Subscriber

    Messages:
    182
    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2005
    Location:
    Florida
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I process ACROS and Velvia Quickloads weekly. Are you standing on carpet or a rug when you are pulling them through the sleeve? Are you located in a cold climate where static electricity may build up in the atmosphere? If so are you wearing shoes (rubber soled) and possibly stand on a rubber mat. I ask because I have never noticed any static light and I am standing on a tile floor in Florida.
     
  3. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,905
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Just about all glues will release static electricity when pulled away from the object that they are stuck to.

    IIRC there is a small amount of cement or glue at the area you describe. I have seen the blue-green static take place, and at most have had just a small line where it takes place on the margin of the film.

    It varies a lot and depends on humidity.

    BTW, take a roll of scotch tape into your darkroom and peel some off. You will see this discharge take place.

    PE
     
  4. cdholden

    cdholden Member

    Messages:
    750
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Location:
    Nashville, T
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The relative humidity in Florida keeps most instances of static electricity under wraps. It's more prevalent in less tropical climates.
    Chris
     
  5. jeroldharter

    jeroldharter Member

    Messages:
    1,954
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2005
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    I live in Wisconsin which can be cold and dry but today it was in the 40's and damp. The relative humidity in my darkroom was 65 - 70%. I was standing on vinyl flooring.

    PhotoEngineer: on just one of my negatives I noticed a small dark line on one of the corners of the processed negatives. That was the only evidence of mischief that I could find.

    Thanks for the feedback.
     
  6. fwp

    fwp Member

    Messages:
    64
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I've had the same thing happen to me. Since then before I pull the film I exhale into the sleeve to increase the humidity in the sleeve and help reduce static. I then pull the film out of the sleeve very slowly. I still get a flash every now and then but it's a lot smaller and has never fogged the film.