Provia100 E-6

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Sean, Feb 20, 2003.

  1. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member Admin

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    I shot my last roll at 100, maybe I should drop it just a little. Hard to say, any provia100 xperts in here?
     
  2. bmac

    bmac Member

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    I hate Fuji films in general, I find them way too cold for my taste. When I do shot them, I tend to rate them at 80 and use a Tiffen 812 filter and hope for the best.

    Try a few rolls of the new Kodak GW100 when you are done shooting that green junk.

    Brian
     
  3. Prime

    Prime Member

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    I love Fuji films in general, but I, too, find them rather cold. I almost always use an 81A filter, and I may soon decide to warm it more. I rate Provia 100F (my standard film) at 80, although that is sometimes still too fast for my taste. I think that you should run a test roll on subjects that you photograph frequently. Bracket each setup, note the exposures, then choose your own speed for the film.
     
  4. Super Graphic Guy

    Super Graphic Guy Member

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    I used Fuji Provia and Velvia for about 2 years based on the well meaning recomendations of others, and found Provia 100F cool as well. Regardless of the development, it almost always had a blue cast. Kodak films are warmer and more to my liking. I have not tried the new E100's yet but do like the previous E100S film much better than Provia. In 4x5 grain is not an issue. YMMV.
     
  5. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    It's going to depend on your lab and your own equipment. Fuji E-6 films are actually supposed to get a longer first development than Kodak E-6 films, and not all labs distinguish. I find I get a legitimate EI 100 from Provia 100F, and if anything I'll sometimes underexpose it 1/3-1/2 stop to get more saturation.

    In 35mm I prefer Kodachrome 64, though, for a medium speed transparency film, and I use Provia 100F pushed one stop when I need a little more speed.
     
  6. Thilo Schmid

    Thilo Schmid Member

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Super Graphic Guy @ Feb 21 2003, 06:04 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>Regardless of the development, it almost always had a blue cast.&nbsp; Kodak films are warmer and more to my liking.</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    Provia 100F is actually very neutral. I don't believe that you really do have a blue cast (one which is present in the whole picture). But I agree that Kodak is warmer and more pleasing. The slightly warmer rendering keeps open shadows more neutral, IMO. Moreover, the so-called “original vision” always seems to be little warmer than it actually was. The longer ago, the warmer it seems to get.