Pushing Arista.EDU

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by John Irvine, Jan 1, 2009.

  1. John Irvine

    John Irvine Member

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    Through lack of foresight, I found myself at a community New Years Eve get-together with Freestyle's Arista.EDU 400 film in the camera. The setting was an indoor stage set for young musicians. Not too contrasty where the kids were playing. I shot at ASA 1600 to get enough shutter speed to have some control of camera shake and performer movement. The problem is, I have no idea what developer/time combination to use. I have D-76 and HC 110 on hand with chemicals to whip up some custom recipes.
     
  2. brofkand

    brofkand Member

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    You'll get a fairly usable image pushing that far. It's only two stops. I pushed Arista II (rebranded Agfa film...I believe their EDU is Foma) two stops and got a very usable image, and only moderately grain.

    I've read on some sites that 1 min/stop additional at 68F is what is needed. Others say add a few degrees to water temp and develop for normal time. I don't really know if there are any true "rules" to pushing film. If there are, I would hope someone would chime in because I would love to know.
     
  3. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    I'd try adding 20% to your normal development time. I don't know how successful that will be though- while I love the Arista.EDU Ultra films (especially the 200 speed film) for studio/portrait work, I find they are a whole stop slower than the box speed suggests. I think you'll get a very thin barely useable image, but the only way to find out is to give it a try. I don't know what to recommend as far as your developers are concerned, as I don't normally use either, but since you'll need every bit of oomph to get what you need out of the film, I'd try the HC-110 (HC stands for Highly Concentrated).
     
  4. jolefler

    jolefler Member

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    I may be way off base....

    in light of the above answers. I've pushed the .edu film to 1600 once and gotten usable images. My rule of thumb is to not mess with different concentrations or temperatures. I add 50% of my normal time for each stop of a push. So at a normal 8 min. at box speed, it's 12 min. for 800 and 18 min. (not 16 min.) for 1600.

    Keep in mind that at the loss of one or two frames, you can clip test a portion of the roll.

    Jo
     
  5. R W Penn

    R W Penn Member

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    Try ACUFINE add a little time 10%
     
  6. John Irvine

    John Irvine Member

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    Following jolefler above, I went 18 min in D-76. Worked fairly well. Under the spot lights, where the performers were, the details were good. Out of the spots, things get dark fast, which was good to demphasise all the microphone stands, wires etc. Certainly a good starting place.