Pushing Kentmere 100 to 800

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by beala, Aug 2, 2009.

  1. beala

    beala Member

    Messages:
    11
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Does anybody have any development times for push processing Kentmere 100 ISO film 3-stops (to 800 ISO) in D-76. According to the Kentmere data sheet, if I want to push the film 1-stop to 200, I should increase the development time from 11.5 minutes to 15.5 minutes. This seems like a big jump for only 1-stop! If I want to push it 3-stops am I looking at a 20+ min dev time? Any info on this would be appreciated! A quick search didn't turn up much on kentmere films, and it seems that a lot of people didn't even know that kentmere made films!

    Thanks!
     
  2. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

    Messages:
    1,897
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Location:
    Saint Paul, MN
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yeah, this is a new product, so you are likely to have a hard time finding good info. If you accidentally shot a roll at 800, and if you care about the images, I would shoot another test roll at 800, cut it into pieces, and see what you get at different times. If you are doing this for the fun of it, I guess I would suggest the same thing, basically, just test it. If you need to shoot something in lowish light and need 800 speed, I would recommend investing in a roll of 400 speed film to do the trick. Tri-X or HP5+ both will work nicely at 800 with little or no adjustment to the developing times. I believe that Kentmere is a traditional grain 100 speed film, I would guess it is at least a little similar to the Ilford Pan 100, and you are likely to get some ugly results pushing to 800, especially as this is a 35mm film.
     
  3. beala

    beala Member

    Messages:
    11
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Thanks for the quick response! The roll was pretty much just for fun/experimental. My girl wanted to hit up the local outdoor theater and I thought it would be a good chance to take some shots, but all I had on hand was 100 speed film. Anyway, I decided just to try to develop it all at once without any tests, and it came out very grainy and contrasty, which I actually quite liked. I used a stock solution of d-76 and bumped the time from 9.5 minutes to 20 minutes.

    And thanks for the recommendation! 400 speed does look a lot more versatile. I'll have to stock up on that!