Pyrocat HD tray processing of Tri-x

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Landrum, Oct 5, 2003.

  1. Landrum

    Landrum Member

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    Can someone point me in the right direction for ball park starting times for tray processing Tri-X in Pyrocat HD. I need to find out the times for the 2:2:100 dillution, for pt/pd. While I'm here I guess I should ask for the standard time and temp info as well for 1:1:100. I shuffle the film, not individual sheets. I know I have seen this info somewhere, but it's like the proverbial "can't see the forest because of the trees". There is so much information bounding about nowdays it hard for me to remember where I saw it.

    Thanks

    Greg
     
  2. sanking

    sanking Member

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    Greg,

    I hope someone else can help you with this question. I don't do tray develoment anymore and all of my data on TXT is out of date and of questionable reliability. However, based on projection I would think that you will need about 14 minutes of development of TXT with the 2;2100 dilution to get to a DR of about 1.6 thate would be suitable for pt/pd printing. This would be for a normal SBR scene.

    Maybe somebody can give you more precise information. I actually have some new TXT in 7X17 size that I need to test and when I do I will make the data available.
     
  3. juan

    juan Subscriber

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    Sandy may be about right at 14 minutes. I tried old Tri-X at 9-minutes, 20C 2:2:100 and the negatives were too thin for easy Azo prints. I'm sure they'd be far too thin for Pt/Pl.
    juan
     
  4. Landrum

    Landrum Member

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    Sandy, I just mixed the Pyrocat developer for the first time and everything went into solution easily. I used a few drops of alcohol to get the phenidone to go into solution, I suppose that will evaporate out or is so minute a quantity that it has no noticeable effect.

    I processed new Tri-X for 14 minutes at 70 degrees, it seems real close, depending on how much the stain increases contrast. The stain is a chocolate brown color, with none to not much edge staining at all. I really hate how Kodak is now exposing the film name into the rebate on the notch side, they started doing this with transparency film about when E100VS was introduced a couple of years ago. It doesn't matter with transparencies because not many people make contact prints of chromes.

    I compared the freshly processed Pyrocat hd film to some previous PMK processed film and was amazed at the comparison. Pyrocat had much finer grain, I mean way noticeably better. It also appeared substantially sharper than PMK. The biggest deal to me was I shuffled through my eight sheets of film like I was using Rodinal, no mottling, uneven staining, no finger prints, nothing. I'm really happy with my initial results.

    I want to mention this about the new Tri-X, this is the first I've used the new stuff and I usually use HP5 and occasionally Tri-X. Last year when Kodak was putting out the propoganda about the new films one of the things they were touting was less sensitivity to dust. Dust has always been a problem with me and several of my friends for B&W sheet film, never ever an issue with chromes. I load my film under identical conditions to the transparencies and always have some dust with B&W. I started being more careful with the B&W but it never really made a difference. The new Tri-X I just processed had not one speck of dust. I feel that Kodak was able to use existing technology that they borrowed from their transparency line of films and make improvements, in at least Tri-X in regards to dust. I can't speak for the other films that have transferred to the new facility in the last year because I haven't used them. To me this is a great improvement.