Quesion about rewiring an enlarger

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by S_Patton, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. S_Patton

    S_Patton Member

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    Living in an apartment, I'm having to use the spare bedroom as a dark room and it is a major pain to unplug the stove and run a cord to the enlarger just so I can print my photos. I picked up an Omega C-700 for 50 bucks to use in the converted bedroom and am curious if it possible to rewire it to run off 110 rather than 220. Anyone know if this is possible? . . . I figure it'd be better to screw up a $50 C-700 than my $1000 C23. . . know what I mean? :wink:
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    A small transformer to convert the voltage wouldn't be very expensive. Thjey are sold for commercial power tools in the UK, I'd guess they must be availble in Russia as well.

    Ian
     
  3. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    If you have to ask, then maybe its not such a good idea to try :smile:

    Having said that, many times a manufacturer will have both 220 and 120 taps on the primary transformer in the power supply if it is an 'export' model. So, it would be a matter of switching the wire over to the correct terminal on the transformer and changing the plug if needed. Though, I know in the D5500 Omegas, the 'switching' power supply is not amenable to easy voltage conversion.

    If it is a condenser head, and the bulb runs right off the mains, it could be as simple as just replacing the bulb.

    The other way would be to get an external step-down transformer of the appropriate wattage and not alter your power supply.
     
  4. Anon Ymous

    Anon Ymous Member

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    Heheh, the OP is in Moscow, Idaho, USA. :tongue:
     
  5. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    I know where Paris, Athens, London & Moscow are :D we have APUG members in all of them, all lost . . . . . :D

    Ian
     
  6. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    A C-700 you obtained in Idaho is wired for 220??
    If there isn't a switch on the back of the power supply, it may be possible with an internal fix, as Ic-racer indicated.
    OTH, there are zillions of Omega power supplies on ebay that are 110, and some of them are available for reasonable money.
     
  7. Pinholemaster

    Pinholemaster Member

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    Or install a 220 line to the enlarger from your circuit breaker. Much easier.
     
  8. Lee L

    Lee L Member

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    Is this with the C760 Dichro head, or just the plain C700 B&W head?

    Lee
     
  9. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Two things; one) C-700's can be used for 110 or 220, if standard condenser head change plug(male)and install proper 75w/110v lamp. 2) if dichroic, purchase appropriate voltage stabilizer for voltage desired.
    I have a 220-110 transformer that you may have for the cost of shipping, I'm not sure if it is possible to reverse wire it for step-up 110-220. Another choice would be a dedicated extension cable from the breaker panel to the (darkroom), or pull wires to location.

    Rick

    A no 211 lamp may be used as a temporary replacement. The correct bulb can be had from Freestyle Photo.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 4, 2010
  10. fotch

    fotch Member

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    Question, is your 23C 110 or 220? Have you already plugged the Omega into the 220v outlet? It would be strange that your finding consumer or standard enlargers in the USA that are other than 110v.
     
  11. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    The Omega C-700 is sold as 220v/240v in the US as new stock, so it's not that strange. B&H sell them.

    Ian
     
  12. Tim Gray

    Tim Gray Member

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    Is it 220 V? Or 240 V? I thought 220 V was the European standard. 240 V and 208 V are US standards, but not as common in the household as 120 V. Ignoring the 208 (three phase), I think some appliances in the house do run off of 240 V, like stoves etc.

    So, do you mean 220 V, like a European enlarger would be equipped with, or 240 V, which I guess a heavy duty enlarger might be equipped with if it had serious power needs? If the former, the power supply might have a switch on it to operate at 120 V. If it's just a standard tungsten bulb with no supply, it should be fine even at 120 V. Or get a US bulb for it. If it's got a projector bulb and/or power supply, look for a 220-120 adapter like Ian mentioned.

    If it's 240 V, then look for a US 240-120 adapter.
     
  13. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    The European standard is 220/240V, and here's the enlarger at B&H.

    Transformers for 220/240 to 110/120 are very common in Europe as power tools on building sites have to run at 110n and have cut out/surge protection, but step down transformers will be easy to find in the US and very cheap.

    Ian
     
  14. fotch

    fotch Member

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    Are you sure. Not that I doubt you but wonder if you have a different web site (overseas?) than the normal one. The link to B&H USA as folllows:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=39289&Q=&is=REG&A=details#specifications LINK

    It indicates Voltage 120v, 50/60H. For replacement bulbs PH140 Lamp - 75 watts/120 volts.

    Since B&H sells world wide, I am sure they have or can get the models you state, however, not for the average USA user.

    I am sure they make an export model for other markets. How are 2 of these, and different brands, showing up in ID?
     
  15. fotch

    fotch Member

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    I posted after you had already posted, your link confims its special order, not a stock item.

    From the link it states:

    • Usually ships in 2-4 weeks
    • Important Notice!
    • This is a special order item and is non-cancelable and non-returnable. Est. arrival at B&H is 2-4 weeks (subject to availability). You will be charged upon placing your order.
     
  16. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    I thought the US electricity grid/generating systemi was rather unique because it's not 100% standardsed, and in a few areas it's DC, not AC, and in small pockets 220/240v but it's years since I last read any details about it.

    Ian
     
  17. fotch

    fotch Member

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    More than you wanted to know.

    I don't know what different parts have but in the Midwest (Chicago, Milwaukee) and most of the states near by, most homes have both 120v and 220v AC. The 220v is mostly for appliances such as Stoves, Water Heaters, Electric Heat, Central Air Conditioning large window AC's, and in the home shop, certain tools such as HD table saws, etc.

    Industrial/commercial areas can also have 3 phase.

    So, most everything from enlargers, computers, TV's, lights, drills, and so forth are 110v, sometimes stated as 115v or 120v, even though they are all the same (the voltage varies somewhat in different locations).

    I though DC wired homes was back in the beginging of electric use and would be surprised if its in widespread use anywhere in the USA, but then, maybe in DC?
     
  18. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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    Isn't the 220v supply actually closer to 208v derived from connecting across two of the three phases rather than one phase to neutral?


    Steve.
     
  19. Lee L

    Lee L Member

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    That's the common method in private homes and small businesses, and equipment for that situation is designed to operate efficiently there. Industrial settings are more likely to have 240 VAC in a three wire single phase setup and full 240VAC industrial electrical equipment.

    Lee
     
  20. S_Patton

    S_Patton Member

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    Thanks, guys. . . I was a little surprised to find out it was 220/Eur wired. . . The guy I got it from just got back from Germany where he bought it. . . I got my Beseler while I was living in Italy. . . So I should've known. . . :surprised:

    As far as the "if you have to ask, you probably shouldn't try" response. . . you're probably right. . . there are only two things regarding electricity I'm any good at. . . flipping the on/off switch . . . and making two pieces of short pipe into a long one. . . other than that it's "call an electrician". . . . :wink:
     
  21. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    My transformer can be wired to give step-up as well as step-down voltage. You can have it for postage(it weighs about 12lbs).

    Rick
     
  22. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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    208 vac is the voltage between two legs on a 3 phase supply, each leg measures 110vac to neutral/ground. Domestic supply to houses is 220 vac between the two hot supply lines, which are each end of a grounded center tapped transformer. Each line measures 110vac to neutral or ground.
     
  23. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    120, and 220 are just nominal values. Folks in the USA that are more hard core into guitar amp building and guitar tone than myself run a variac to set the voltatge. My workshop measures 117V with my RMS meter most of the time and I'm fine with that.

    Here is Robben Fords rig. Notice the red Variac!

    [​IMG]
     
  24. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    I actually thought you WERE in the real MOSCOW. Since you are in the US, an external transformer to run a 220 appliance or running a line for a 220 appliance are less than ideal things.

    I DID have a USA Omega D power supply open a while back and I'm pretty sure its transformer had both 120 and 220 inputs on the primary, even the box was just wired for USA. So, I suspect the Euro 220 units are using the same transformer that would also have the 120 inputs.

    Personally I'd take up the kind offer for a second power supply if its the right one for your enlarger!
     
  25. fotch

    fotch Member

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    I have a small German tool the came with a step down transformer for USA market. The motor is very small so its not very big. I would check eBay and elsewhere to find out what a step-down transformer would cost to run the watts needed, which I would take the stated wattage and double it.

    Or, if to expensive, find a moon lighting license electrician, and see what he would charge to run a 220v outlet to your darkroom. Unless you area is different, prices should reflect the market, meaning cheaper now than 2 years ago.

    If it were me, I would run the line, however, I can do my own electric.