Question about filter colors

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by bvy, Sep 2, 2011.

  1. bvy

    bvy Subscriber

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    I have two 1 1/2 grade filters here for enlarging. One is from Ilford and is reddish orange. The other is from Kodak and is a pale yellow. What am I missing? Are they functionally equivalent, or is one possibly mislabeled or faded?
     
  2. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    If you look at the data sheet with, say Ilford paper, you will see that there are several different filter grading systems each with their "own" colors. Use whichever set is complete or that you are happy with. Taking a filter from system x and a filter from system y and using both at one time probably will not get you what you want.

    Steve
     
  3. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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    Both filter systems pass non-image forming lite as an aid to seeing the image when dodging and burning. The Ilford system passes red light (the color of a red safelight), the Kodak system passes orange light (the color of an 'OC' safelight). Kodak filters are lighter and have an orange tint to them when compared to Ilford filters.

    You can use Kodak filters with Ilford paper but the contrast grade will be a bit different from that produced by the Ilford filters. When used with Ilford paper, Kodak filters won't produce the same 'constant exposure for ~1.0 OD' that Ilford filters produce.
     
  4. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    You really need a 0 and 5 and can make successive exposures, split filter printing.

    No filter printing = a #2 filter. So now make hard grades with consecutive exposures of 2 & 5.

    Soft grades 0 and 2