Question about Nikon F6 metering and filters

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by olwick, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. olwick

    olwick Member

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    Hi,

    I'm considering a Nikon F6 and read about how great the color matrix metering is.

    My question is how does that system work if, say, I have a red filter on it? I shoot primarily B&W and use colored filters quite a bit. Does that affect the metering (aside from the normal filter factor) since the new metering system takes color into account?

    Thanks,

    Mark
     
  2. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    If the matrix metering system of the F6 is any where near that of the F5 then I don't think it would work well for B&W work. I don't have the F6 but with my F5 the matrix metering is not good for B&W work. Try it out for yourself.
     
  3. olwick

    olwick Member

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    Thanks Chan. But as I mentioned, I'm considering the F6, so I'm enquiring before buying, therefore I can't try it out for myself.
     
  4. chuck94022

    chuck94022 Subscriber

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    I would avoid matrix for B&W with filters. Instead, I'd spot meter the shadows, and compensate -2 stops from the meter reading. Use the camera's spot meter.

    This is simple to do in camera. Set -2 stops exposure compensation on the camera. Set to spot metering mode. Meter the shadows and exposure lock. Recompose and shoot.

    Matrix is for color. Works exceptionally well especially for slide film. It's not for filtered B&W, but that doesn't take anything away from it. None of the sophisticated modern scene evaluative metering systems are tuned to filtered B&W. And if you are shooting with a red filter, it is almost certain you are shooting landscapes and taking your time. Red is not generally a street shooter's filter, for example.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 2, 2013
  5. BMbikerider

    BMbikerider Member

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    I have a F100 which has much the same matrix metering as the F5 and 6. I have never had any problem with the metering when using B&W filters of whatever hue with B&W film.
     
  6. destroya

    destroya Subscriber

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    like chan said I have never liked how B&W turned out on my F5 using matrix. I usually dont shoot B&W in the F5. but if I do I change to either spot or center weighted metering and the results are much better.
     
  7. olwick

    olwick Member

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    Thanks guys. Not really looking to do spot metering or CW. I'd just buy an FE if I was. The project I want to do is in changing lighting conditions, so I was really just looking for info on how the color matrix metering reacts to red filters and b&w film.
     
  8. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    So is it the case that matrix metering doesn't give the correct exposures for B&W and a red filter gives an even more incorrect exposure than no filter at all i.e. compounds the problem or is it simply that whatever the exposure is shown to be without the filter then adding the filter simply adds say 2/3 stops to the in-camera exposure as a red filter will do.

    I realise that a red will add extra exposure and none,some or all in-camera exposure systems will underestimate the correct exposure with a red so some manual compensation may have to be made.

    To check by how much, if any, that a camera underestimates the extra exposure for a red surely all the F6 user has to do is check what exposure the filter factor gives compared to the TTL meter and then compensate for the difference?

    I fear we may be putting the OP off buying a F6 for B&W film and red filters when any problem if there is one is far from insurmountable.

    pentaxuser
     
  9. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    If the OP wanted the F6 because he can use the terrific matrix metering system with B&W and with the red filter then I certainly want to put the OP off on buying the F6 for that purpose. If the OP were to use it on color transparency then it's a different thing all together.
     
  10. lightwisps

    lightwisps Subscriber

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    I have had 4 Nikon F5s and have never seen any meter like what these babies have. B/W and slides are all I shoot and both come out fine.

    I shoot a lot of IR and the Red Filter is metered just fine. Good luck with your F6 if you go that way. Don
     
  11. olwick

    olwick Member

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    Thanks Don, that's exactly the answer I was looking for.
     
  12. vpwphoto

    vpwphoto Member

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    Good info. I snagged a stupid cheap F6, and have always photographed with the F100 and others on manual, so I said, why did I buy this thing? Might as well look into how good the meter/computer is. I'll be selling a stupid cheap F100 shortly too!