Question for Harman Technology / Ilfordphoto

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Aurelien, Mar 31, 2008.

  1. Aurelien

    Aurelien Advertiser

    Messages:
    669
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2006
    Location:
    Limoges, Fra
    Shooter:
    Med. Format RF
    Hello Simon,

    As you know, the Eastman Kodak company has launched an improved version of TMax 400. I have tried it, and really, it's really an interesting film.

    My question is the following: will Harman launch new versions of films, or new films, in a near future? Is your Research and Development still working on it?

    What are your plans, if not secret... ?

    Best regards,

    Aurelien
     
  2. Simon R Galley

    Simon R Galley Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,052
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Location:
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Dear Aurelien,

    Our R & D constantly work on a range of projects, and they are directed between pure Photo R & D and Photo manufacturing R & D, new Raw material R & D as well as inkjet R & D an 'other projects'.

    As to our film range we believe we have a highly competitive family of products, as you know we brought back SFX and we did look very closely at a 25asa Delta emulsion but it was not given the go-ahead. The difficulty in 'new' film products is the return on investment and the nett increase in sales, so often what actually happens is that the sales are just diluted across the range, not increased, and whilst we would love global monochrome film sales to increase they are not at present. We will look to continue to make our full film range available in as many formats as possible including ULF and to continue to ensure that our customers around the world have the best possible access to them via our distributors.

    I applaud KODAK's decision to launch a new product and wish them well, I hope this answers your question.

    Kind Regards

    Simon.R.Galley, ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :
     
  3. Aurelien

    Aurelien Advertiser

    Messages:
    669
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2006
    Location:
    Limoges, Fra
    Shooter:
    Med. Format RF
    Of course, yes, I would like to thank you for this.

    Indeed, if you keep all your range of films in production, it's great.

    :smile:
     
  4. Trevor Crone

    Trevor Crone Member

    Messages:
    547
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Location:
    SE.London
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Hi Simon,

    I wish Ilford would release a 4x5 film in a system compatable to Kodak's 'Readyload' and Fuji's 'Quickload'. HP5/Delta 400 in a 4x5 packet format would be bloody marvelous. But I realise it's probably a bit 'late in the day'.

    Regards,

    Trevor.
     
  5. Aurelien

    Aurelien Advertiser

    Messages:
    669
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2006
    Location:
    Limoges, Fra
    Shooter:
    Med. Format RF
    As ar as everybody know, the production of 220 film would be great too, but I know your answer about it...
     
  6. Chazzy

    Chazzy Member

    Messages:
    2,951
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2004
    Location:
    South Bend,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I was sorry to have to switch to Kodak.
     
  7. Barry S

    Barry S Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,339
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Location:
    DC Metro
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Ilford introduced a reformulated version of Delta 400 in 2001 and I'd prefer they not "improve" it. For me it's a perfect film with fine grain and smooth tonality. Is there a better behaved film around? It kills me that it isn't offered in 4x5 or 8x10 sheet film, so I'd like to see that addressed--even if only on a once/year special order basis. A Delta 100 refresh would be nice--the new formulation would probably obviate the need for a Delta 25 film.
     
  8. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

    Messages:
    3,894
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2003
    Location:
    Middle Engla
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I also cannot understand why Delta 400 is not sold in 5x4 size, but Delta 100 is.
     
  9. Renato Tonelli

    Renato Tonelli Subscriber

    Messages:
    669
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Location:
    New York Cit
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've always wondered and never really, really understood why no manufacturer has a 400iso in quickload/readyload. However, I must admit that I am grateful for what is still available.
     
  10. JLP

    JLP Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,610
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Know that the Delta 400 in sheet film has been discussed quite often on this forum and i hope that is still a consideration at Ilford/Harman to reintroduce it.
    I know that i would never look back if i could get it in 4x5 and 8x10 (5x7)


    jan
     
  11. Paul Verizzo

    Paul Verizzo Member

    Messages:
    1,261
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2008
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I find myself saying "ASA" a lot, old habits are hard to break. It flows of the tongue easier, too.

    Implies that you have been around awhile, too.
     
  12. eddym

    eddym Member

    Messages:
    1,927
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2006
    Location:
    Puerto Rico
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I refuse to say "ISO"... people think I'm talking about shooting a digital camera.
    Besides, then I get a chance to explain about the olden days when we all took Real Pictures, not "virtual images."
     
  13. jackc

    jackc Member

    Messages:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2008
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Simon,

    Even if the total market does not expand when you introduce new film, would new film cut you more market shares, say from Kodak, Foma, etc? I imagine the film market as a whole is still very large and profitable and will remain so for some years to come. So it may still be a good thing to do? Look at the auto industry: everybody knows oil is doomed, probably run out in 20 years, or price go sky high or suffer from punishing environment control levy, yet all these car companies keep designing new cars. I won't pretend to know business better than you, but if you can recoup your investment in a few years and possibly earn couple more years of profit from it, it may still be worthwhile to do.

    Also, have you looked into the Chinese market? Digital cams are comparably very expensive there (I have first hand knowledge of this.) While many areas are at par with developed countries in terms of technology usage, the vast majority, here we are talking hundreds of millions of people, don't own or use computers. So traditional film is still more convenient for them. Even if you could get film to just one tenth of them, it could be bigger than the rest of the world put together. Then there's also India.

    These countries have unlimited purchasing power (China is already #3 economy and poised to surpass japan any time now), and at the same time they are very insophisticated about how to spend their new found wealth. So there may be great opportunities for you there. Most of those who dared to try their hands in China ended up succeeding beyond their dreams. Getting into China may be easier than you think! Once you do, volume would be assured.
     
  14. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    9,284
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2002
    Location:
    Bergen, Norw
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I still think of it as 27° DIN...
     
  15. David Grenet

    David Grenet Member

    Messages:
    310
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2007
    Location:
    Sydney, Aust
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Well there we go - with you two combined we have ISO 400/27° :tongue:
     
  16. Paul Verizzo

    Paul Verizzo Member

    Messages:
    1,261
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2008
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL
    Shooter:
    35mm
    So how do you do "sunny sixteen" with DIN?

    Yeah, I thought so.

    :D

    (Ouch. I can almost feel the wrath coming.)
     
  17. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    9,284
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2002
    Location:
    Bergen, Norw
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I don't do "sunny sixteen" with ISO or ASA either, that would give me lots of underexposed film. :wink:

    So what I do is to estimate the lighting levels, compensate for contrast, and expose accordingly. No numbers involved. :D
     
  18. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

    Messages:
    3,894
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2003
    Location:
    Middle Engla
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    That's the "wet finger" method that I don't use in winter since I've forgotten how to compensate for wind chill. :sad:

    But what has this got to do with Ilford films you may ask. :confused:
     
  19. Simon R Galley

    Simon R Galley Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,052
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Location:
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Dear Jack C,

    We do sell in China, but only to the very highest level, the reason is twofold we must pay import duties and China still has a domestic manufacturer of mono film ( some say 2 with ERA ) but China Lucky do supply film and paper and the price is very, very low, people who want our quality and can afford it do buy it.

    Regards

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :
     
  20. jackc

    jackc Member

    Messages:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2008
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Simon,

    May be some marketing effort would be useful (in China). Ilford is well known for not doing much marketing. China has changed a lot from even 10 years ago (again I have first hand knowledge of this.) Western luxury items and fashion sell like hot cakes there (and they can afford it.) I'm sure price is not an issue if the quality is good. And we know Ilford quality is good. Some bill boards with cool and sophisticated Bristish style fashion/beauty in black and white ought to be extremely attractive to the Chinese. Don't just do this in a few major cities. Focus more on second tier ones. Cheaper, more effective.

    So long you are in business. Marketing is always necessary. You don't just wait around till it dwindles away.