Question on HC-110

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by kintatsu, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. kintatsu

    kintatsu Member

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    I've ordered some HC-110. The plan is to use dilution H, giving me 10 minutes for HP5+, 4x5. I currently use Tetenal Ultrafin 1:20 and Ultrafin Plus 1:9.

    With both, I get consistent results, with the agitation the same for both developers.

    Will I need to change my agitation for the HC-110? Most of what I've read here confuses me somewhat, with differing opinions and the case being made for and against its use. The dilution H time is 10 minutes, while my Tetenal times are 13 minutes.

    It would seem that slightly reduced initial agitation, and the same intervals would produce similar results to what I'm getting now.

    Does that make sense, or am I out in left field somewhere?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Neil Grant

    Neil Grant Member

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    Why change the agitation at all? You're agitating to prevent uneven development. More or less initial agitation make make no difference - as long as it's sufficient.
     
  3. kintatsu

    kintatsu Member

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    Thank you. I was getting confused by the arguments for and against its use as I'm a little slow on the uptake! There were post recommending changes to agitation and some against it.

    The reason I thought decreasing the initial agitation is due to the decreased development time. It seems like the shortened time, with the same initial agitation would give higher contrast, as it becomes a greater percentage of total time. I'm glad to hear that I shouldn't have to change things other than time. Thank you!
     
  4. mandoloid

    mandoloid Member

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    Would it make sense to sacrifice a few sheets of film using your standard agitation schedule? That may be the best way to observe any differences (or none) between developers. You'll probably always receive variable advice from people with their own habits. For example, my roll film schedule is based on this (www.jasonbrunner.com/hc110-a.html)
     
  5. kintatsu

    kintatsu Member

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    That seems the most sensible thing. Since the mail takes forever to arrive here, I thought to get any questions that might arise addressed prior to working with it.

    Most other questions are handily answered, between here, and other sites. I like Jason Brunner's stuff, his videos are funny and always have a cool way to work through things.

    I likely have another week to wait, so just planning things out. I'm shooting something today, and will do 2 shots the same, saving 1 for the HC-110, and developing the other accordingly. Thanks for the link and for the advice. As I said, I don't always think right.
     
  6. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    OK. Total negative contrast (difference between deepest shadow and most intense highlight) is a result of how you expose your film, and developer temperature, concentration, and time.

    With agitation you mainly change the shape of the film tonality curve, i.e. what the tonality of the film is, not the total contrast, and is something you might wish to try if you don't like how your prints come out. But start with standard agitation, like 10s every minute in a tank, or shuffle in a tray, or whatever your method is.
     
  7. kintatsu

    kintatsu Member

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    I see, so by changing the characteristic curve, you appear to change contrast without actually doing so. That changing your agitation actually changes the steepness of the curve, rather than the limits of the values. I hope I re-stated that correctly. My main question is the will change in developer with the same agitation lead to blocked highlights? That's probably the way I should have phrased the original question. It also appears that the answers given here generally agree that trying my current method is the best starting point.

    I have tried different agitations, primarily for increasing or decreasing the highlights without a great change in time. I hope this makes sense, as I've only been doing my own development for about 11 months, and seem to have found what works well for me.

    Thank you for your answer and the help. I really appreciate it from everyone!
     
  8. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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  9. Rafal Lukawiecki

    Rafal Lukawiecki Subscriber

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    Ideally, you could perform a negative development time test. Basically, you expose a step tablet, like Stouffer on 5 sheets, rolls etc, then you develop each for a different length of time, using your normal agitation etc. You measure the results, plot 5 curves, and figure out your own development time.

    Easy to say. Now you can enjoy the millions of posts here on the ins-and-outs of what happens, and how to interpret the results. Perhaps you should plan on doing this some time in future, not yet. B&W process is extremely forgiving. Enjoy the fun of it, though.
     
  10. kintatsu

    kintatsu Member

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    Thanks for the link. It's really interesting, and the comments add to the understanding. The idea in the article seems, at least to me, to be something that should be readily understood, especially after reading it.

    I think, when I develop I'm trying something similar, without even knowing it. For instance I give a slight decrase in highlights by switching from a 10 second rest to a 15 second rest. When I view the resulting prints, I notice a change in highlights, but almost no change in the shadows if I keep the time the same.

    Thank you for your help and for the informative link! I'm sure I'll be refering to it again in the future.
     
  11. kintatsu

    kintatsu Member

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    I don't think I'm quite ready for that, although I probably should be doing it. First thing is to learn to develop right every time, and get good results. then I'll have to learn about plotting curves. With roll film, I did speed and development tests, and found my best results.

    Using sheet films, I haven't gone that far yet, as the results I've been getting seem to match my roll film results. I hope HC-110 will give me the results I've been liking with Tetenal, as it also gives more options for dilutions and therefore development techniques.

    Thank you!