Question regarding paper negatives

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by Toffle, Oct 8, 2007.

  1. Toffle

    Toffle Member

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    I've been trying some experiments to create a paper negative following the "peeling method" at alternativephotography.com (I'm using RC paper)

    http://www.alternativephotography.com/articles/art043.html

    As yet, I have not been able to completely remove the paper backing to achieve a transparent base. 90% of the paper peels off quite neatly, but I'm still still stuck with a stubborn layer of opaque white. Is there something I am doing wrong here?

    Cheers,
     
  2. Loris Medici

    Loris Medici Member

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    Hi Tom,

    In my understanding, peeling RC paper (in order to it as a negative for UV sensitive alternative processes) just makes it much more translucent - it doesn't make it completely transparent. (BTW, the plastic base of the paper is quite opaque to UV, therefore not suitable for the purpose stated above... It should be definitely removed.) So, don't bother with the remnants of the base - unless it adds too much texture - just use the negative... You'll see that your exposure times will shorten considerably.

    Regards,
    Loris.
     
  3. walter23

    walter23 Subscriber

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    Can someone comment on exposure settings for in-camera paper negatives? What kind of speed would you use for say ilford RC multigrade using a yellow or green filter (for lower contrast)? I'm going to try some 8x10 paper negs after I get my 8x10 camera. I'd like to minimize the learning curve so I can get shooting :smile:
     
  4. Loris Medici

    Loris Medici Member

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    Try graded papers in the first place (soft gradation), you'll get more speed that way (since they don't need any kind of filtration). I would test ISO 1, 3 and 6. Another ballpark estimate would be using an EI value of [ISO Paper Speed] / 100. (See the paper's tech. documents to learn its ISO Paper Speed)

    Regards,
    Loris.
     
  5. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser

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    walter

    the asa of paper is anywhere from asa 1 or 6 to about 25.
    i tend to use the lower numbers, and get very good results,
    but others use higher numbers and get good results.
    it all depends on what paper you like to use.
    at one time, i did tests on about 10 or 15 different papers ...
    azo, and other single weight papers ( both kodak and ilford)
    double weight papers like blue box seagul, and agfa ..
    i tested fiber as well as rc papers.

    it didn't take long, and it was pretty easy ( and addictive! ) ...

    goodluck!
    john

    ps. if you use dilute and or exhausted paper developer and a water bath you can
    control you contrast a little bit ...
     
  6. Joe VanCleave

    Joe VanCleave Member

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    I shoot lots of paper negatives, usually in pinhole cameras, but also in glass-lensed cameras too. I use Arista's RC grade 2, and give it an exposure index of '2'.

    I agree with John that a bit of dilute, and/or used, paper developer works well.

    I also have good luck pre-exposing my negs prior to the in-camera exposure; this helps with retaining shadow detail in high contrast light.

    As for contact printing, I've gotten pretty good results with a standard contact print onto FB paper; I really don't see paper texture. A contact print from a LF camera paper negative looks to me like an enlargement from smaller gauge film - you lose a bit of tack sharpness through the softening effects (diffusion) of the light through the paper backing.

    I've also enlarged paper negatives, from 4x5 to 11x14. Had to open the enlarger lens wide, then use over a minute exposure. A lot softer, and the off-axis lens abberations are noticable, but can be okay for certain subjects like portraits.

    ~Joe
     
  7. walter23

    walter23 Subscriber

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    Alright, thanks. I'll be trying it with a filter and multigrade paper (have no real need for graded paper right now, and the point of this is to be cheap and dip into my fairly large 8x10 paper stash rather than buy new stuff).