RA-4 Room Temp Lack of Contrast

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by RellikJM, May 19, 2008.

  1. RellikJM

    RellikJM Member

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    I am using Kodak chemicals and normally I process at 94 degrees using a Jobo CPE-2 processor.

    I wanted to try batch processing at room temp using a vertical slot processor. I developed at 68 degrees for 2 minutes then 2 minutes wash then 2 minutes BLIX then 5 minutes wash. I added 5 Yellow as a correction and added 1/4 F stop more time in exposure. The resultant prints at room temperature lack the contrast that I am used to using the Jobo at 94 degrees. It is normal to have reduced contrast using RA-4 at room temp?
     
  2. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

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    YOu could try increasing time to 2 1/2 or 3 min. and further increasing exposure.

    IMHO, either due to my inadequacies or due to actual problems with this approach, I have never been able to attain a room temp. print that looks as good as a print I can make on my RA-4 machine.
     
  3. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    I have made dozens.

    Use Kodak RA-RT developer replenisher mixed as per instructions. I mix 1/2 of a 10 liter kit at one time.

    Sorry for your problems. I hope this helps.

    Since you did not specify what developer you used, I would guess that it is the developer if it is not the RA-RT.

    PE
     
  4. RellikJM

    RellikJM Member

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    Found the Problem! Thanks Photo Engineer!

    I am using Kodak RA-4 RT replenisher mixed as developer.

    I found the problem, I was going from developer to a 2 minute wash instead of going to a :30 stop then a 1 minute wash. I found this by searching the Photo.net archive and someone else was making the same mistake and Photo Engineer made a clear point to let them know that stop was needed as a anti-fogging agent. THANK YOU PHOTO ENGINEER! :smile:

    So to recap the "new" process:

    1: Expose with 10Y added and 1 F Stop more exposure.
    2: Develop in RA-4 RT Replenisher Mixed as Developer for 2 Minutes at 68 degrees.
    3: Stop in 28 mL of KODAK Glacial Acetic Acid per litre of water formula for 30 seconds at 68 degrees.
    4: Wash 1 Minute In Water at 68 degrees.
    5: BLIX in Kodak RA-4 Bleach Fix for 2 Minutes at 68 degrees.
    6: Wash for 5 Minutes In Water at 75 degrees.
     
  5. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

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    Why are you using a water bath after your stop? The stop's other purpose is to prevent developer carryover and contamination of your blix. So you don't need to use water AND stop. Water does the same thing, just not as well.

    Another thing you can do to see if you're getting full development is to develop at 2 min. and then develop at 2 1/2 min with the same exposure. If you see any difference with 2 1/2 as opposed to 2 (more density), then change to 2 1/2 min. Personally, I don't see a difference, so I've stuck with 2 min.

    So here's what you should have your times at:

    2-2 1/2 min. Developer room temp.
    1/2 min. SB
    2-2 1/2 min. Blix.

    5 min. Wash
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 21, 2008
  6. RellikJM

    RellikJM Member

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  7. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

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    Well, do what you want, but it's needless. It even says *optional wash* in the link you gave me, and only 30 sec. There's no difference in quality or print longevity, maybe a minimal benefit to your blix.

    What is a slot processor exactly? I've only ever heard of drum, tray, and roller transport machines. Do you have to change solutions manually? If it's automated, then an extra minute wouldn't be that big of a deal. After 20 or 30 runs through the cycle though, changing solutions by hand, it's starting to impact your turnaround time.
     
  8. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

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    One other thing I do not understand: You have a temperature-controlled processor that can process RA-4 to Kodak's specifications, but you're opting instead to run the process at room temperature. I can think of no benefits to this approach at all. If you really want to follow Kodak's advice, process at the proper temperature and save a whole bunch of time too!
     
  9. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    If you use the stop, the wash is not needed.

    PE
     
  10. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Some vertical slot processors are temp controlled but others aren't and rely on the room temp being at least at the minimum range for room temp processing. Nova make both kinds of processor. The ones which can be set for 95F give the best of both worlds as they are quicker than a Jobo drum which requires fill and dump several times for dev, stop and blix as well as drying before the next print.

    The downside to a slot processor may be that unlike B&W chems which will last several weeks in a slot processor when covered by a hollow tube on top, colour dev may need emptying and storing in a brown bottle in which air has been excluded.

    I suppose that if you were doing enough prints per session then you could simply dump the dev at the end and use fresh on the next occasion.

    pentaxuser
     
  11. RellikJM

    RellikJM Member

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    I like to print everything that I take a picture of. I use a saunders multi-easel to put 2 5"x7"'s on one 8"x10" sheet. With 24-26 pictures on 12-14 8"x10"'s to print, the Jobo can only do two at a time. The Moduline processor allows me to print 14 8"x10"'s with a basket system.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 22, 2008
  12. FilmIs4Ever

    FilmIs4Ever Member

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    He says he has a *temperature controlled* Jobo, so I have no idea why he'd switch to a slot processor in the first place.

    Thanks for the explanation of what a slot processor is. I thought he was referring to a different kind of processor originally.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 22, 2008
  13. RellikJM

    RellikJM Member

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    Until I heavily modified the Jobo it did not maintain any decent standard of temperature control. After two pumps and a PID controller it is now acceptable to maintain the needed +/- .5 for paper and +/- .25 for film.

    I use the slot processor for volume, the Moduline allows up to 14 8"x10"'s at room temp.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 22, 2008