Rangefinder and filters?

Discussion in 'Rangefinder Forum' started by Fotophreek, Mar 20, 2012.

  1. Fotophreek

    Fotophreek Member

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    I'm familiar with the functions of a rangefinder camera, But have yet to use, for example, a polarizing filter on one. How do you know if it's working or not?

    Thanks
     
  2. Rol_Lei Nut

    Rol_Lei Nut Member

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    You have to look through and orient it before monting on the lens.
    Adding one or more reference marks to the filter ring can help find the same position after mounting.
     
  3. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    Grab one bigger than lens, rotate to desired setting through your eye, hold it against lens.

    There are push on filters as well, but I havent seen one personally as a polarizer.
     
  4. resummerfield

    resummerfield Subscriber

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    To quote from a Leica brochure... "The Leica polarizer filter simply pivots 180 degrees to the 12:00 position above the camera. While looking directly through filter, the polarizer is rotated until the desired effect is achieved. Then the polarizer is swung (or pivoted) back to the closed position - which is exactly a 180 degree arc. Now the polarizer filter is front of the lens and doing its job. The simplicity is genius." Here is the link at B&H... Of course, this genius is priced in the Leica tradition $$$
     
  5. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    I use Rol_Lei Nuts method. Most polarizers have an index mark on the rim that should point towards the sun for maximum effect. Years ago, before reflex cameras were popular, some polarizers had a little lens on an arm that could be used for viewing. Hard to find these used these days, and I don't think there are any new ones being made.
     
  6. ROL

    ROL Member

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    As mentioned, looking through it is your best bet. Remember to adjust exposure appropriately (usually 1.5 to 2 stops) for the polarizer.

    Let me add that while useful, this comment taken by itself may be somewhat confusing. This does not mean that the polarizer itself will only work if aimed (on camera) at the sun. In fact, the exact opposite is the case (or perpendicular :wink:). Polarizers are only effective in a range of angles at 90 degrees from the sun. In other words, and you can test this for yourself before ever mounting the polarizer on the camera by looking through the filter and rotating it, the light cannot be polarized effectively when the view is either into the sun or in a broad range 180º opposite of the sun. One time–honored, off–the–cuff, method to deciding whether a polarizer may be used effectively is to hold your hand up with fingers pointing towards the light source (i.e., sun) and outstretched thumb. Your thumb will then point to an approximate direction at which light may be polarized effectively by your filter.
     
  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    It is easier to use Rol_Lei Nut's method if you have two identical polarizers - one to leave on the camera, and one to view through.

    On the plus side, rangefinders are much easier to use with darker filters like deep reds or IR filters, because you don't have to look through the filter to compose or focus.

    The same holds true for TLRs.
     
  8. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    Now when it comes to Red/Orange/Yellow/Green filters for black and white shooting... how do SLR users stand the pain of looking through a filter when composing and shooting?

    Sure it reminds you you're using black and white film, but it's a distraction when you know what to expect from the filter and just want to focus on your composition.

    (Trivial point for sure, but the advantage goes to Rangefinders on this issue).
     
  9. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    True. But the index mark on the filters are meant to be aimed at the sun. It can be confusing if the sun is not perpendicular to the lens axis, but one can kind of figure it out. I do look through the filter, but often just use the index mark. I like the suggestion by MattKing to have two filters. I think I will try that out.
     
  10. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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    But sometimes doesn't remind you that you have just loaded colour film!


    Steve.