RB67 metered prisms?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by homeiss, Jun 20, 2011.

  1. homeiss

    homeiss Member

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    I have a Sekonic L-308S flash and it works great, but sometimes I feel like it would be nice to have a metered prism. They can be quite pricey, especially the PD Prism, and the CDS prisms sound kind of flaky.

    So basically, I want to know if you think they are worth it? Do they work well?
     
  2. Marc B.

    Marc B. Member

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    I have RZ's, not RB's, so hopefully some more experienced RBr's will chime in on this.
    CdS meters work very well, you just need to ensure the meter is powered by modern Alkaline or Silver Oxide, 1.5 volt or 6 volt batteries, not 1.3 volt Mercury batteries.
    The PD for RZ is an exceptional value, but this prism won't work on RB's, as it receives it's power from the camera body of the RZ.
    The PD prisms for RB and RZ look almost identical, so don't get them confused.

    Prism for RB (non metered)
    http://www.dennisonjones.com/ebay/L0958.jpg
    http://www.dennisonjones.com/ebay/L0960.jpg

    PD Prism for RB (metered)
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/images/images345x345/33864.jpg

    Prism PD for RZ (metered)
    http://i36.tinypic.com/16abc45.jpg
     
  3. CGW

    CGW Member

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    In a word, no. With a good incident/flash meter--which you already have--you're set. You might get some use from a spot meter--Sekonic 508s are becoming very affordable--though it's dependent on what type of shooting you do most.
     
  4. CGW

    CGW Member

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    In a word, no. With a good incident/flash meter--which you already have--you're set. You might get some use from a spot meter--Sekonic 508s are becoming very affordable--though it's dependent on what type of shooting you do most.

    I have an RB with WLF/Prism finders and haven't really felt the need for a metered finder. I tried the old CDS metered "stovepipe" and found it on again--off again accurate, due probably to age.
     
  5. jun

    jun Member

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    I do have a CDS prism finder, not the PD prism finder.

    It works well except:

    1. It is said that it is center weighted, but is close to average.
    If I recall it correctly the new PD prism finder (the plastic outer cover one)
    can select spot and average metering (I don’t have it so I can’t comment on this).

    2. The center match needle movement of the analog meter is relatively small against the light change and the (shutter speed) adjustment dial angle change.

    Well I got this CDS prism finder about $20 so I am very satisfied.

    Note that this CDS prism finder takes two (2) SR44 silver oxide cells.
    You may can use the alkaline equivalent LR44, but SR44 is better for voltage stability for this application.
    (The new PD prism finder takes the 6V one if I recall it correctly)

    If you are interested in this CDS prism finder, I will recommend checking the accuracy of the meter (for the entire range of light intensity) before you buy since CDS may drift by age.

    Note that you must attach the CDS prism finder to the body to activate the circuit of the meter (there is a switch that sticks out from the bottom, and when you attach the prism, the switch will turn on). Also you must turn on the slide switch, which is located on the side of the prism (which is quite obvious).

    I often use with the Polaroid back with Fuji 100 speed color and 3000 speed B/W instant film and my prism meter works fine with these exposure sensitive films.

    Note that any RB prism is heavy though.
    However, I only use RB67SD with prism only (metered and non metered, never use waist level) and handheld only.
     
  6. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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    I don't own a RB 67 but if I did I'd go for the meter less prism, and use the meter you already have.
     
  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Do you shoot a lot of close-up/macro work? If so, metering prisms can be quite handy.

    Otherwise, for an RB, I find them too large.
     
  8. homeiss

    homeiss Member

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    Thanks for all your thoughts everyone!

    I shoot landscapes and portraits mainly. I have a WLF and recently picked up a prism finder model 2.

    I will probably just forget about metered prisms, unless I find a deal I can't pass up... :wink:
     
  9. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    I bought a metered prism simply because wanted a prism and I found the metered one for the same price I could get a non-metered one for.

    It's the CDS variety and works fine. The only value I find in TTL metering for the RB is with regard to taking bellows factor out of the equation on closeups.

    For me though, I still want to eliminate reflective metering issues, and that means I need a gray card to be able to measure the incident light. That's workable but in the end I find a handheld meter and a quick look at the side of the camera easier and more consistent.
     
  10. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    I'm with Benjiboy, but I do own a RB67. I rather have a handheld meter.

    Jeff