Really old Sheet Film??????

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by rcovingt, Jun 11, 2008.

  1. rcovingt

    rcovingt Member

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    I purchased a Graphic View II today....Thing looks like it is brand new came with a tremendous amout of stuff....including about 75lbs sheet film and 50 riteway film holders..

    Most of the film is sealed in its original box never been opened... and the film holders appear to have exposed film in them...but this film is from the early 60s

    yes 45-50 year old film

    I have developed roll film that was a decade old by using a couple of drops of edwal restrainer in d76 and recieved decent results...but this is stretching it.

    So what concoction would you recomend for use in a rotary processor to salvage these images that are exposed...

    and what would be some fun stuff to do with the rest of this film..

    I know there has to be some life in this film it is just how we decide to develop it...will post results


    The flavors of film are as follows:

    Tri-X Pan
    Panatomic-X
    Ektachrome EHB---yes I know E-4--

    best regards


    Robert
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 11, 2008
  2. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    There was no E-6 45 - 50 years ago. So, before you process it make sure you have the right process. Any negative color film before C41, and any reversal film before E6 will ruin modern processes. The emulsion will wash off the film support and ruin the developer.

    PE
     
  3. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    The old b/w film could be salvagable, depending on your characterization of what "acceptable" is. HC-110 is a very good choice for old film, because it is a very "clean" working developer that minimizes age fog. You will have to experiment. The film will probably have lost considerable speed, and developing times to give acceptable image-to-fog will have to be derived by trial and error. The Panatomic-X will probably have survived better than the Tri-X has. Don't be surprised if you find out that the "effective" ISO is down to 3 or so. You should use a 3 to 4 minute water pre-soak before going into the developer. This seems to help achieve even development (for me) of older films. Your most likely candidates for success are from sealed factory packs of film, as they have the least exposure to outside air over the years. You will probably find that you will need a shorter developing time than recommended for fresh film.
     
  4. kevs

    kevs Member

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    Hi rcovingt,

    With regards to the E4 film, I once processed a roll of Ektachrome IR (E4 version) in E6 chemistry and obtained good results. I read somewhere (yes, i hate that phrase too!) that it could be processed in E6 for 20 minutes at 20 degs C. IIRC, my results were acceptable, and the emulsion didn't fall off the film.

    If you're a regular E6 user, or know someone who uses it, you could try this with chemistry that's on its final cycle before dumping. Anyway, you have little to lose except your time and patience :smile:
     
  5. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    Tri-X Pan
    Panatomic-X
    Ektachrome EHB---yes I know E-4--

    PanAtomic in DK 50 will work, short development time, high speed films like TriX are more prone to fogging. I have shot refergierated Plus X and Pan F from the 70's with good results. For the Ektachrome look for a E 4 or GAF kit on ebay.
     
  6. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    The E4 films had no hardener in them and were intended to be run through a process with a prehardener at a temperature of 85 degrees F. Without this prehardener, especially at temperatures above 68 degrees, you can get a mess.

    I'm surprised that any E4 film could survive in an E6 process. My experience has been totally opposite.

    PE
     
  7. Stephanie Brim

    Stephanie Brim Member

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    I'd shoot the Panatomic X and develop it in HC-110 or Rodinal. The Tri-X is most likely too fogged to really use...but I'd use it anyway, and never mind the fog. The Ektachrome I'd probably just keep in the boxes. Then again, I'm not much of a color shooter.
     
  8. kevs

    kevs Member

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    Just to clarify my above post, it was a three-stage kit E6 kit I used, but it was so long ago (prob. late 1980s) i forget the exact details. I *think* I used 20 mins in each bath at 20 degs C. But it definitely produced acceptable images.

    OT: I'll be interested to see your results, Robert. I have some old Ilford mono film, dated 1968, might try that one day...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 13, 2008
  9. rcovingt

    rcovingt Member

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    Went to the rodeo with the panatomic x---nights shots----pushed the film 3 stops....developed the film 1:50 hc110 with 3cc of edwal restrainer---first roll developed for 23 minutes---super thin not worth printing--second roll same chemistry 34 minutes---all I can say is pretty neat stuff appeared on my proof sheet, in fact I have a panning shot I will be posting as soon as I can get a quality scan (my epson v750) should be here anyday now. Working up the courage to move away from the 120 roll film into the 4x5 tri-x pan---should make for a quality experiment.