Reccomendation for E-6 processing Chemicals

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by htmlguru4242, Oct 22, 2005.

  1. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    I have recently obtained about 50 sheets of E-6 sheet film (Ektachrome e100 and Provia III), along with two 120 rolls of ektachrome, and I'm quite eager to shoot it and process it before it expires in August '06

    I have NEVER processed color before, so I'm looking for a reccomendation for an E-6 developing kit (or individual components, if more economical / significantly better). I'm not looking to spend a terrible amount (like <$50) on the chems.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    You can get the Kodak 7 step process for about $70 US, this is what I use when processing my E6, are you using a roller processing machine?

    Dave
     
  3. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    I do not have a roller processor, though I can access one [not convenient]. I have manual tanks for 135, 120 and sheet film, and, of course, trays. I'm aware that this is probably not optimal (or good) for color development, but is there a way to make it work?
     
  4. L Gebhardt

    L Gebhardt Subscriber

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    The Tetenal 3 step works very well for me. I use it in a Jobo and follow the directions exactly. I think you can get a 1 liter kit as well as the 5 and 15 liter kits. 1 liter developes 12 rolls of film if you reuse the chemicals - I do without a problem.
     
  5. L Gebhardt

    L Gebhardt Subscriber

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    Years ago I did E6 this way with the Kodak Hobby kit and it worked fine. Just setup a large tray for a tempering bath and keep your tank and all chemicals in this. You can just leave a thermometer in it and add extra hot water as needed to maintain temperature.
     
  6. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    The tembering bath is a good idea - and a good use for the darkroom sink. Maintaining 38ºc shouldn't be too hard.

    The three bath kits are just developer, color dev. and blix, bypassing the bleach / reverse step, yes?
     
  7. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    I've used 4x5 tanks with SS hangers, drums, deep tanks with film clips, and just about every combination in between. I've used hand agitation, rotating drums, and nitrogen burst. I have even done it in a tray but not E6 and not at 100 deg F. That is one thing I would not try to do.

    As long as you adhere to the time, temperature and agitation recommendations of the manufacturer for the method you choose, you probably won't go wrong.

    I must point out a few things. Best results are usually obtained with either Kodak, Fuji or Agfa chemistry. All others appear to have some deficiency or other AFAIK. Another is that E6 processes with a blix instead of a bleach then fix tend to allow more silver retention causing problems in highlights.

    PE
     
  8. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    THe kodak 6-bath kit makes 5 liters and is only $50 US, though B&H won't ship it ... That probably seems like my best bet.

    I also didn't think that tray processing E-6 at 100ºF wasa good idea - especially in complete darkness ...

    I'll see waht I can do
     
  9. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    FWIW, I've used a Paterson Chrome 6 kit for three 35mm rolls now. The first two rolls came out fine. The third roll had magenta shadows (including the sprocket and inter-frame areas). The troubleshooting guide says this is a sign of contamination of the first developer with the color developer. I can't rule this out, although I thought I was being careful to avoid this. That's the extent of my experience to date, though. FWIW, I bought the Paterson kit because I was buying from B&H, and they would ship it, but they wouldn't ship other E6 kits. I believe Freestyle, Adorama, and perhaps others are more willing to ship other E6 kits, albeit only by ground.
     
  10. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    It is odd that B&H won't ship some things, though I have noticed others will. I never air ship anything anyway, as it is too expensive, and I typically don't need htings next-day.
     
  11. Earl Dunbar

    Earl Dunbar Member

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    Many years ago I used the Tetenal kit for Agfachrome. It was quite easy, the results were "Just super, Reggie" (very obscure refrence...), and I was very pleased.

    Any method will work as long as you control the temperature within range. I agree that tray processing would be very risky, so a tank setup would be the minimum requirement.

    Earl
     
  12. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    Might be that B&H don't want to deal with the hazmat paperwork, I know when I get my kits, I have to pay a hazmat handling fee to the shipping company.

    Dave
     
  13. htmlguru4242

    htmlguru4242 Member

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    Hmmm ... probably true about the hazmat stuff. How much are hazmat fees usually??

    It might be worth a drive down to NYC to pick it up (along with other stuff) from B&H myself - does anyone know if their in - store prices are the same as online??
     
  14. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    Don't go to b&h, it's worse than apug. They have everything you've ever wanted and you'll spend all your money.
    I've been there 2x and they've got a very unique way of doing business. You walk in and they take any bag you may be carrying. You can look at most items but they are cabled off to a shelf. For instance, i was looking for backpacks which they have a ton of but you can't try most of them on since they are connected to the bottom shelf. I asked them to remove the cable so i could put it on before i dropped $200 and they said no. Most items have to be put onto your "account" which is then printed out for you to give to a clerk at the end of your shopping session. You can't actually pick up your items and continue shopping. If you see something you want to add, then you must find another available clerk and get another printout at his computer. Your purchases then go into a basket moved on a conveyor system along the ceiling to the first guy that adds up your order. You finally pay someone and pick up your stuff. It's worth the trip just to shop their.
    I've been told that the reason why they've got the best prices and the conveyor track system is because they are owned by a diamond mining company and B&H is how they move money around. Interesting.
     
  15. Ben Diss

    Ben Diss Member

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    Prices at the store are the same as on-line, however the NYC store and the website use different inventories. This means what may be in stock online may NOT be in stock in the store.

    -Ben