Recommend a glue?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by Wolfeye, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. Wolfeye

    Wolfeye Subscriber

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    I have a nice lens that has a rubber grip to focus with. Problem is, the focus action is a little stiff, so when you go to focus the rubber grip slips and moves, not the lens. I've seen that most of these originally acted by friction alone but as they age and the rubber stretches, that no longer works... so do I glue it? Anyone have a recommended brand or glue product for such a job?
     
  2. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Subscriber

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    I've used clear acrylic nail polish (sold as strengthener). Put ring in place, roll back one side, apply, roll back the other side, apply. Two concerns would be if the nail polish eats away any paint on the lens as it squishes out from the edges, and if the lens is plastic and melts. Let the lens air out for a couple of days no matter.

    Another material I like for such things is called 'transfer tape.' 3M makes it. Basically a thin film of a rubber cement-type of adhesive in tape form. The problem with it is that it is very sticky and can drive you nuts while first learning to use it.

    The thing i like about both of these glues/tapes is that they allow for removal. The acrylic will basically 'snap' after it dries but still holds a collar well. The transfer tape stays gummy and flexible so you can pull things away (watch for stretching; alcohol will help it release).
     
  3. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    I'd peel it back and add ATG tape to the barrel. Not permanent but very sticky.
     
  4. BobD

    BobD Member

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    I've fixed that sort of problem on a number of lenses with plain old contact cement. If the rubber is too badly stretched to give proper contact all around, I carefully cut & wrap black gaffers tape around the lens first to increase the diameter and then glue the rubber to it.
     
  5. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    Contact cement is what I've used in the past. Recently I've been using some double faced tape to apply body covering.
    The double sided carpet tape is available at reasonable cost.
     
  6. Too old to care

    Too old to care Subscriber

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    I also used double sided tape, carpet tape works well, there are other double sided tapes that also work well. Nice thing about them, they do not leave a gooey mess if you have to remove it.
     
  7. aoleg

    aoleg Member

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    +1 for adhesive transfer tape (ATG or ATT type). Industrial types can be heat-resistant. Double-sided tape may also work, but those are mostly not heat-resistant. Alternatively, you can use a few drops of rubber cement (the type sold in craft stores, Staples, Office Depot etc.) It's weak enough to get off completely without leaving too much of a residue, but may be just strong enough for your purpose.
     
  8. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    I'd use contact adhesive mainly becuase I always have some at hand as I use it for bellows construcytion and installation, shutter and other camera repairs.

    Ian
     
  9. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    I would probably use a rubber cement, but mostly, as Ian says, it would be because that's what I usually have around.
    If you want a super sticky rubber cement go to a bike shop and get a tube of tubular/sew-up tire glue, which is used for gluing the tires to the rims. It's very tenacious stuff, but remains somewhat flexible.
     
  10. Collas

    Collas Member

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    You could try hair lacquer. Bicycle shops use it to lock handlebar grips in place. It allows the grip to be slid around and then positioned correctly, then it locks it in place.

    Nick
     
  11. mgb74

    mgb74 Subscriber

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    Pliobond (a contact cement) is what is often recommended for camera leather. I've used it (for that purpose) and it works well.
     
  12. Wade D

    Wade D Member

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    Another vote for contact cement. I use it for bellows, camera leather, etc. It should work fine on a focusing ring. I even used it to put a rubber mat onto the head of a Majestic tripod.
     
  13. Leigh B

    Leigh B Member

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    Pliobond is the standard adhesive in the camera repair industry for sticking leatherette and other coverings to metal.

    It's quite resistant to temperature and humidity extremes, yet the parts can be separated if necessary for repairs in the future.

    - Leigh
     
  14. BobD

    BobD Member

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    ... but Pliobond stinks. Or, at least it used to. The smell eventually goes away but it takes a while as I recall.
     
  15. Leigh B

    Leigh B Member

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    Pliobond is not sold at the perfume counter. :tongue:

    - Leigh
     
  16. Greg Heath

    Greg Heath Subscriber

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    Pliobond. Ace Hardware. Michaels craft store. I use it on all bellows I replace. It does stink until it dries. Great stuff. Make sure to stir it before use.
     
  17. John Hermanson

    John Hermanson Member

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    With contact cement (like for gluing veneer) , the bond is permanent, you won't be able to get the grip off for service. it'll have to be ripped off. No epoxy, crazy glue, cyanoacrylate or clear rubber cement found in art supply stores. Use brown rubber cement like "Pliobond" or "Goo" (NOT "Goop"). They cure to pure rubber and can be separated when need be. John