Reels for 120 developing

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by presspass, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. presspass

    presspass Member

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    I've used Jobo reels for more than 25 years and have no trouble loading 35 mm film. It's been a while since I shot 120, but I did a roll over the weekend and then spent more than 10 minutes trying to get it onto the reel. I finally did the 'do not do' routine and loaded the taped end first. That worked, and there were no crescent moon fold marks or other issues. But surely there's an easier way or a better reel; no, I won't try stainless steel. Any ideas?
    Thanks,
     
  2. eddie

    eddie Subscriber

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    I've always loaded the taped end first. Once folded over the end of the film, it's a little sturdier, and makes loading easier. Didn't know it was a "do not do". For me, it's a must do.
     
  3. AdamB501c

    AdamB501c Member

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    I always take the tape off, it's never creased the film and the whole process is a breeze to load.
     
  4. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I always load the taped end first, with SS reels.
     
  5. Ed Bray

    Ed Bray Member

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    I prefer the white Jobo reels to any others but prefer the Paterson Super System 4 Tanks for inversion processing. To this end I adapted all the centre columns from my Paterson Super System 4 Tanks (35mm, 2x Universal and a multi 5 tank) to take the Jobo reels (Had my next door neighbour who is a toolmaker use a lathe to turn the Paterson Columns down to the same diameter as the Jobo Columns).

    I often process 2x 120 on a single spiral in a universal tank. I take the tape off and load the reel with both the top and bottor aligned, I then feed the film on by gently pushing it onto the spiral, when the end of the first film has entered the spiral I just keep slowly pushing the end until it can go no further, I then push the little red film dividing clip into the spiral and start again with the second film.
     
  6. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Same for me, although I use the "AP" plastic reels that are designed to fit in Paterson tanks.
     
  7. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    The Jobo reels have to be very clean, otherwise the film tends to stick in places. This is especially true of 120 film as it is more flexible than 35mm. The two starting points on each side of the reel need to be in alignment as well and it is easy to get these out of alignment. Once the film is started it can be pushed for a while then you can use your two index fingers or thumbs in the cut out section to wind the film on. It is slow but it works.

    Despite what i have said above I still have had problems myself and my favourite solution is to use a Durst 120 tank. This has a feeder which attaches to the reel and the film is pushed through the feeder and fixed to the centre of the reel. Once there it can be wound through the feeder by a small handle on the outside of the reel. I find this infallible.

    Not a solution for C41 films where Jobo rotary processing is needed but for B&W films I'd always use the Durst system

    pentaxuser
     
  8. LJH

    LJH Member

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    I find that the leader sometimes "rears up" once in the spool and gets jammed against the radial arms. Since I found that out, I simply check that this hasn't happened if the film jams, and push the leader back down if it has. This seems only to occur in the outer part of the reel; once the film's got into the reel a bit, it seems to keep going.
     
  9. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear presspass,

    I fold the leading edge back against itself. It seems to spring back enough that the film loads easily. That might be a problem with some cameras though.

    Neal Wydra
     
  10. presspass

    presspass Member

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    Problem solved - it was really old (exp. 2007) Tri-X 320 that had a curl like a spring. Fresh Tri-X (400 unfortunately) goes on just fine. Thanks to all for their help.
     
  11. mfohl

    mfohl Subscriber

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    Hello Folks, here is my trick. I use the Paterson plastic reels, and I have always used 120 film, not 220. And I use Tri-X film, which is somewhat thin. I used T-Max film once or twice, and T-max was nice and thick; I never had problems with T-Max.

    The process takes longer to describe it than actually do it. When I'm pulling the paper off and get to the first part of the film, I rip the paper off. Then with scissors, I cut the corners off of the film. I try to cut off as little as possible; that is, I try to make small triangles (these fall on the floor). Then I roll out the film and cut off the tape and other paper. I then re-roll the film so that the part with the cut off edges is in front. This helps with getting the film all the way on. It helps to avoid getting the film caught on something in the groove.

    With that process, I only have trouble once a year of so.

    Cheers,

    -- Mark