Reflectors

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by Jarvman, May 30, 2008.

  1. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

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    I've got to hand in my location photography assignment for uni on Tuesday and one of the learning outcomes is 'evidence of modified natural light' or using reflectors. I haven't done any yet and am going to London over the weekend and have bought a small 12" pocket reflector to take with me! What creative uses could I put this towards just to evidence use of reflectors? Any ideas? It sucks but I've gotta do it. :confused:
     
  2. Solarize

    Solarize Member

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    That is pretty small as far as reflectors go, so you will be limited in part by that. A few obvious examples spring to mind: a before and after portrait for example, with the sun (if you are lucky!) being behind the subjects head and a reflector used to 'fill' in the face. If the reflector has two coloured surfaces, try each.


    While you are not directly modifying the light, but rather making it work for your subject, you could demonstrate the ways in which architcture and/or nature themselves modify light. Take for instance a portrait under sunny conditions on open ground, at midday; the subjects eyes might appear quite dark, with harsh shadows being cast from the nose and other features. Then move the subject under a tree or into the shade from a building, and demonstrate the way this can diffuse and soften the light to create more flattering imagery. This could be extended to using say a large white wall as an environmental 'reflector'.... position the subject facing the wall and pretty close to it. Vary the wall/subject distance and shot some examples when they are well away from the wall.

    Also bear in mind that the light from a diffuse light source (i.e. a reflector) will fall off quite quickly.

    Good luck and experiment widely. There is a lot to be said for preparing these examples in advance, but approach each location with an open mindset.
     
  3. Pinholemaster

    Pinholemaster Member

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    No class project sucks.

    With a small reflector, why not look at small objects and details with and without the reflector modifying the light?

    London is full of interesting details. So get in tight on something, then shoot it with and without reflected light. Great way to learn what you can do with reflectors.

    Then you'll be motivated to get a larger reflector in the future.

    I think you've given me a great idea for my advanced B&W photography course next spring. My students thank you.

    Now get out and shoot, and stop whining. This photography, not work. Making pictures is FUN. Geez, you'd think you were taking Organic Chemistry or something. Students!
     
  4. Jarvman

    Jarvman Member

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    haha, apologies for souding such a whinge! I'd much rather be out arsing around with reflectors than doing the essay for 'visual language' and powerpoint presentation for the 'computers in photography' module. It's just become another thing in a long line of things that needs doing by Tuesday! I shouldn't really be going away to a gig the weekend before. I guess I said it sucked because I didn't think anyone here would use them in their photography prolificly. What are you thinking of doing pinholemaster? Think that the details of statues and architecture as well as flowers could be good subjects for such a small reflector?
     
  5. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    I think flowers could be a great subject. You could get some front lighting direct from the sun and reflect some light towards the back (or do it the other way round). Some flowers with semi-transparent petals and leaves could be made to glow.


    Steve.