Refreezing exposed color film.

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Mike Kennedy, Sep 30, 2005.

  1. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Member

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    If it isn,t possible to get your exposed color film to the lab just how long can it be put in the ice box befor significant deterioration occures?

    Thanks Much,
    Mike
     
  2. gbroadbridge

    gbroadbridge Member

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    I wouldn't re-freeze. It should be fine for at least 3 months.
     
  3. dphphoto

    dphphoto Member

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    I wouldn't try to put film in the fridge/freezer once it's out of the sealed packaging. The film will stick to itself because of moisture build-up and be ruined. Dean
     
  4. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    I have never re-froze exposed film and sometimes I have taken extended photo trips, normally as long as it is kept in a cool dry place, it will last quite a while without changing the dynamics of the film, a couple of my trips it was close to 6 weeks before we could get the film to the processor, and the film didn't show any ill effects of being non-frozen.

    Dave
     
  5. Helen B

    Helen B Member

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    I don't know of any general rules for how long exposed film can be kept without deterioration - it will vary from film to film, as well as being temperature dependent. Tri-X and Kodachrome had good reputations for latent image stability, for example.

    The first parts of the latent image to go will be the shadow details - the fewer silver atoms in the image centre, the shorter their survival time. I've noticed that the faster the film, the less stable the latent image shadow details are.

    Re-freezing exposed film is no big deal, and I used to do it as a matter of routine when living in the tropics. Just wrap it closely (ie as little airspace as possible) in an airtight wrapper and put it in the fridge or freezer - the fridge is likely to be cold enough for all but very long delays before processing. Allow plenty of time for it to warm up again before opening the package.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  6. roteague

    roteague Member

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    So true ...

    You also need to consider the location where you live and where you are shooting. I live in a very high humidity area, and as was pointed out the film will stick when you refreeze it, under the conditions of where I live.
     
  7. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    I freeze mine. 120 goes into M&M plastic tubes. 35mm back into 35mm plastic cans. Never had a problem.
     
  8. reellis67

    reellis67 Subscriber

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    Mmmm... M&Ms <drool> Neat idea. I use those ADOX containers from J and C. 4 for a buck and they last forever (or at least a really long time). I only occasionaly re-freeze film, but I never had any problems using the plastic film containers. Please note that few times part. Your mileage may vary. Now, I need to go get some M&Ms...

    - Randy
     
  9. Helen B

    Helen B Member

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    I'm quite surprised to hear of problems with exposed film sticking in high humidity areas when refridgerated or frozen. Could those of you who have had the problem give us your interpretation of what caused it, or more details of how it was packed, whether there was airspace, how it was warmed up etc? Apart from still film, in S E Asia I used to refridgerate all exposed movie film that was not going to be processed the next day. Short ends and recans (ie film that had been loaded into a magazine, not used, then unloaded back into the can) went into the freezer.

    Thanks,
    Helen
     
  10. roteague

    roteague Member

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    I primarily shoot sheet films, so my experiences are based upon that. When I first tried shooting B&W cut film (like Efke PL100 and Delta 100), I found that the sheets would stick together if I didn't put them back into the box with the interleaving paper - I didn't try put into the freezer after that. I also didn't try to put the film into the freezer right after unloading the holders. Most of the film I shoot is QuickLoads, which I don't refrigerate. I tend to err on the side of caution.
     
  11. Helen B

    Helen B Member

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    Thanks Robert. I'll change my advice regarding freezing sheet film! I used to have problems with sheet film sticking in high humidity, but that occurred whether it was frozen, refridgerated or left at ambient temperature. I wonder what the mechanism is - ie how freezing makes the situation worse. Thinking aloud - the moisture could migrate out of the gelatin as the temperature falls, to collect as a thin ice layer on the surface of the film.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  12. manjo

    manjo Member

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    That is when mailers come handy, I normally send them out as soon as I shoot them, hot off the camera. When I am back home from my vacation/shoot I already have my slides waiting for me at home.