Reloadable 35mm Cassettes

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by pokerplayer269, Dec 18, 2008.

  1. pokerplayer269

    pokerplayer269 Member

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    Hello. I've been hoping to start buying film in bulk but am a bit confused about the reloadable cassettes. The cassettes on B&H range from about 50 cents to almost 85 dollars per cassette. Why this huge price range? Are the 50 cent cassettes one-time-use or something?
     
  2. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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    I only saw reloadables ranging from $0.59-$0.74 depending on metal vs. plastic.
     
  3. jmcd

    jmcd Member

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    If you buy 5 rolls of film at Freestyle, over the phone, they will ship you 25 cassettes as a bonus.
     
  4. pokerplayer269

    pokerplayer269 Member

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  5. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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  6. Monophoto

    Monophoto Member

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  7. Rol_Lei Nut

    Rol_Lei Nut Member

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    The only really (relatively) expensive reusable cartridges are the old Zeiss & Leitz ones, which open mechanically while in the camera, thereby avoiding using any felt (no scratches or friction).
    Unfortunately they only work on classic Leicas, Contaxes and a few Soviet cameras (though I did get a Zeiss one to work on my Nikon F).

    About metal vs. plastic cartridges, I prefer metal as the ends of the plastic ones seem to want to twist off by themselves....
     
  8. Jim Jones

    Jim Jones Subscriber

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    I've used a hundred Kalt brand metal cartridges over and over with almost foolproof results. However, it's messier to tape the film to the Kalt spools than to the spools from Kodak cartridges. Kodal spools fit the Kalt cartridges perfectly. The all-plastic cassettes may be easier to use, but otherwise are a pain. I've also used the metal proprietary cassetes for Nikon and Leica. They are expensive, but worth it for some applications.
     
  9. naeroscatu

    naeroscatu Subscriber

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    most people myself included re-use film cassettes that are thrown away by photo labs. Just go and ask them, you will be surprised. It may be a problem to find a photo lab that still develops film these days but if you do you can get away with a full bag for the cost of $zero. The film is pulled out of the cassette by the developing machine and cut leaving out about half inch that you can use. You tape head to head your bulk film and the piece of film coming out of the cassette and roll in using your bulk film loader.
     
  10. IloveTLRs

    IloveTLRs Member

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    I use both plastic and metal ones. The plastic ones are easier to open because they have screw-on tops. I use some plastic tape I got at a $1 shop to tape the film to the spool - works like a charm.

    Reusable cassettes are also good in case you rip a film inside a camera. Just open the camera in a changing bag/dark room and respool onto the reusable cassette. Easy! :smile:
     
  11. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Hi,

    I'm considering starting to bulk load as well for a few projects I have in mind.

    I am worried about metal cassettes popping open on me. I have had this happen on a factory cassette when I dropped it, and the reusable metal cassettes I have (my step dad's from the '70s; old but never used) don't seem to hold closed nearly as securely as a factory cassette. I was looking at the B/H plastic cassettes instead because they have a screw top. Whatever you do end up using, let us know how it works out, as I am curious myself.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 22, 2008
  12. white.elephant

    white.elephant Member

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    Those older Ilford cartridges were great. I used to do the exact same thing. I threw them all out, though. Sigh.