Renew My Faith Please ...

Discussion in 'Product Availability' started by wysiwyg, Jun 26, 2006.

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  1. wysiwyg

    wysiwyg Member

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    Okay, I am very discomforted by all the rumors that I am hearing about these film companies going away from film production.

    I am a dedicated analog film person, who occasionally argues with the digital salespeople at Henry's, and I am becoming worried that my hobby that I have cultivated for the last 10 years will soon come to an end. Is film's future a shear cliff in a few years?

    I am trying something new, infrared B&W, and so far I have enjoyed the results. But, I've been told, Ilford is not making IR film any longer, and Kodak is getting out of the business. As far as the Niagara Region (in Canada) is concerned, no one has ever heard of Maco or Rollei IR Film. So I am stuck on where to get film. Everyone is digital, and there is no way I am changing over yet.

    So, my concern is, please tell me that there will be IR film, true B&W film, Colour Slide and colour negative film and most important, 120 roll film available for at least the next 5-10 years. I love my Mamiya and would not trade it for any digital yet. Also, I use Kodak HIE (35mm), Ilford B&W (35mm and 120 roll) and Fuji Velvia (120 roll) or Reala (35mm).

    I need my faith renewed. :smile:
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Read Simon R. Galley's posts here on Ilford's commitment to B&W.

    Check out J&C, who are making lots of B&W films available from East Europe and from the major manufacturers.

    Look at the recent successes in organizing special orders for ULF and odd-sized sheet films from Ilford and Kodak.

    Go to filmshooting.com to read about all the latest Super-8 film stocks.
     
  3. unregistered

    unregistered Inactive

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    "...and I am becoming worried that my hobby that I have cultivated for the last 10 years will soon come to an end."

    Except mine is a career for over 25 years professionally.

    I'm too old to start another career.
     
  4. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Just keep shooting, and don't worry about that stuff. Consider the sources, for about a minute, and then forget about it. You can really worry about it if, and when you have to. (how's that?):smile:
     
  5. blansky

    blansky Subscriber

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  6. wysiwyg

    wysiwyg Member

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    lol ... looks like I should've said "faith in film". Great advice folks. Now I have some sites to go and read. I really have to research where I can get these films from because around the region here is becoming scarce.
     
  7. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    It's all over for film and paper. It's about all gone and there will never be anymore. Go out and shop for a digital camera, get the best one that you can. After a few days you will stop worrying about "if" film and paper will disappear and realize that eventually everything will disappear even the digital cameras of today. The nature of technology is to reinvent itself over and over. You have to live for today and not be so concerned about what or if or when. If you could or someone else could pin it down they would make a million.
     
  8. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    In most cases we have to rely on what we read in terms of commitment to film BUT some of had the chance recently to visit Ilford and see the commitment LIVE so to speak from every member of that company. I can't speak for any other film maker but I am convinced of Ilford's commitment and ability to deliver on that commitment. Incidentally it was clear how much Ilford values the N American market.

    Just have a look at the thread on the Ilford visit to check out all our impressions and arrive at the same conclusion.

    pentaxuser
     
  9. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Member

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    Sacriligeous!!!! Good thing Vatican II got rid of purgatory son, or we would have reserved you a chair in the waiting room. :tongue:

    I will light a candle for you and say a novena. In the meantime, I see that the URL you gave is unowned. Have I got an idea to make a few on the side...
     
  10. DBP

    DBP Member

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    Over the past few years we have lost a bunch of Polaroid products, K25, Velvia 50, some films in small formats (110, APS, 126, disc) and Tech Pan. The death knell for Polaroid non-professional films sounded when decent 4x6 prints from d***cams became viable. I suspect K25 and Velvia 50 were replaced as part of the ongoing product development cycle at those two companies. The smaller formats I think were falling to the improvements in 35mm automated film handling even without the advent of digital. Meanwhile we can still get sheet film in almost any size, ortho films in several formats, and a variety of other odds and ends that have not been in general use for decades (620). One of the wonders of the internet is that it allows markets to exist globally that could never generate enough volume without it. Thus, you can buy glass plates, flashbulbs, 126 and 127 film, 3x4 sheet film, and kits for alternative processes that most photographers under 60 didn't know existed.

    For that matter, you hear the comparison made to buggy whip manufacturers going under when the automobile came along. But you can still buy buggy whips, or special bullets for black powder rifles, to take another example of a long obselete technology.
     
  11. fparnold

    fparnold Member

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    Yes, but try to get enough men in Red coats together to use those black powder rifles to keep your colonists in line these days.
    <br>
    <br>
    To the OP, with apologies to the Kodachrome enthusiasts, there have never been better color films available than there are today. In B&W Ilford makes great products, and Kodak TMax and TriX seem to be safe for the forseeable future. Shoot them, make prints and enjoy the possibilities. If it goes away, you still have the artisitic skills (or can start making your own Autochromes). If it doesn't, then you're several albums of negatives/transparencies ahead of where you'll be if you sit around fretting.
     
  12. DBP

    DBP Member

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    Those were muskets, for the most part. The rifles came along during the 19th century unpleasantness.
     
  13. Black Dog

    Black Dog Member

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    Novena? wasn't Kurt Cobain their singer :smile::smile:But seriously, while some fantastic products have bitten the dust (RIP VP, TP and Ektalure:smile::smile:), there are loads more out there (Delta 3200 in 120, Fortezo, Kentona etc etc) and others hopefully on the way (come on down, Delta 25). There is also a hard core of analogists and more of us are coming out of the woodwork.
     
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  15. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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    On the subject of continued availability of film, Ken Rockwell summed it up on his website with this comment "..Thus if the three people left on the planet who shoot super-8 in Kodachrome can still get film I doubt we'll ever have a problem in still formats.."

    In fact, read the whole article here: http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/filmgoingaway.htm

    Steve.
     
  16. Simon R Galley

    Simon R Galley Subscriber

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    I really do not think you have to worry, choice will inevitably diminish ( which is a shame ) and further consolidation in the coating of silver halide products will take place, but I think the obituary for film is just a little premature, I think the somewhat dramatic reporting of the changes from film to digital and the 'agonies' of the manufacturers as they adapt to the new market realities just hype it all up from time to time. Monochrome will always have a place ( and silver colour too ) it always will, why, because ART and CREATIVITY cannot die, and the requirement to make that ART last will ensure the future of the silver halide process: Photography did not kill painting, in fact it let many more people experience the art of painting...also as long as people want the best, a manufacturer will make it. But analog photography does need advocates and people to share their knowledge and teach the next generation the methods of traditional photography, its why I and my company support APUG..

    Simon Galley ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited
     
  17. catem

    catem Member

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    Thank you!
     
  18. eubielicious

    eubielicious Member

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    I personally do not find anything to worry about. So long as there is enough demand for film, there will be someone enterprising enough to fulfill the demand. So if Kodak stop making film, there will be an ADOX or Foma to fill their shoes. As Simon Galley made very clear, Ilford Photo have no intention of going away and appear to be not just standing still selling the films that have worked so well in the past, but appear to be looking at new products.

    Euan
     
  19. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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    If my experience is anything to go by (which it usually isn't) I think we will see a slight increase in film use in the future rather than a decline.

    I have owned film cameras since I was about ten (I'm 41 now) starting with an Agfa folder then progressing through Nikkormat to Nikon and had always done a bit of photography. However, I didn't get fully into photography until I received a digital compact as a christmas present. This was followed by a Nikon D100 which has now been displaced by a Bronica ETRS, a Rolleicord, a home made 5x4" and numerous other e-bay bargain film cameras some of which I have modified to take film that they were never inted to take.

    There, I've admitted it, digital made me a committed film user! Does anyone else have similar experiences? ...... No?..... Just me then!


    Steve.
     
  20. catem

    catem Member

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    I can't say I've gone the same route as you but i also feel more confident about the survival of trad photography than I did a couple of years ago. Although it will always be a niche market i think people (consumers of photographs too) are beginning to realise that they want to preserve it before it's too late. Triumphant claims about the end of film just ring a little hollow and boring to me now, whereas I used to find them depressing...
    cate
     
  21. wysiwyg

    wysiwyg Member

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    I guess that I am at the depressing stage? Anyhow, I think after a couple days of visiting traditional film developing stores and Henry's in the region, the general concensus that I got was that film photography was becoming extinct and the film will not be able to be sourced. I have limited developing resources in the region that will develop professional film, so I can only go by what these people are telling me. And trust me, they are not the typical high school student working weekends, which I try to avoid.

    I think my main worry is that I will not have someone to develop and print my pictures close to home, as well as anyone to sell the type of roll film that I would want. Simon Galley gives a lot of hope. Being from Ilford and hearing what you have to say, does encourage me to keep going with my interests and fight the digital beast for a few more years.

    Thanks for all the comments. And again I must give credit to this forum. It really shows how many people out there are still in film. :cool:
     
  22. eubielicious

    eubielicious Member

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    No Steve, I went by roughly the same route. I've gone from a Nikon digicam (which died), via medium format to sheet film and the Speed Graphic. I suspect there are a few who've done the same thing!

    Euan
     
  23. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    Here is the bottom line; if there is a buck to be made film will be made.
     
  24. coriana6jp

    coriana6jp Member

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    Just go out and shoot! I used to shoot and develop BW back in High School 15+ years ago, and then did bought a DSLR a few years ago. Enjoyed that for a while, and then moved straight in to Large Format and Medium Format. The DSLR sits on the shelf, and is used only for Ebay pictures. I have met several others who have switched from digital back to traditional photography.

    I think that the market is going to consolidate some, and some companies will go out of business/drop some product lines. But I think there are going to be survivors, Ilford I am sure will be one.

    You may not be able to go down to the local camera store and buy film like you once did, but you will be able to get it online from a number of sources.

    I would not worry to much!

    Gary
     
  25. Terence

    Terence Member

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    As the others have said, it'll be around in one form or another. Worse comes to worst and you can make your own (look up a book called "Primitive Photography"). I myself have built up a hoard of film that I use and replenish as a hedge against availability and price. I haven't tried to buy a "lifetime" supply as I'm not sure what that would be, and constantly replenishing my stock keeps up business for those willing to produce film. I shoot almost entirely B&W from 120 up to 8x20, so the film age is not as critical as it might be with color. My freezer has more film than food.
     
  26. copake_ham

    copake_ham Inactive

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    I have little doubt that the long-term prognosis for film is not good - but I don't think anyone can put parameters on what is "long-term".

    While it is true that a considerable majority of all kinds of photographers (pros, amateurs and snapsters) have adopted digital, as of now, film remains readily available, as does processing (for those like me who don't do their own). Also, other than Konica-Minolta and Agfa, both of which had bigger problems than just film, I'm not aware of any major companies abandoning film altogether. And, as some have pointed out, new manufacturers/suppliers have entered the business.

    I have become a hybrid shooter in that I find that while I prefer the image capture of film, I enjoy processing via Photoshop. Perhaps it is hope over reality, but I do believe I perceive a better quality of image from scanned film (i.e. I use a Nikon 5000D scanner) over what would be a "comparable" digitally-shot image with my DSLR. Hopefully there will remain enough photogs out there who agree with my quality asessment for a long time to come thus ensuring at least a specialist-sized market for film.
     
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