Replace the bellow of Polaroid 110a

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by Trent Westin, Mar 8, 2005.

  1. Trent Westin

    Trent Westin Member

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    I was looking around searching for infos and I stepped in your community and I was not able to resist...
    I have a problem with my Polaroid 110a converted to pack films.
    It is a couple of years I own it, I purchased it second hand in Europe, and I think it is a german conversion (or something like this).
    The bellow is never been in perfect condition, but now it is unfixable.
    I cannot paint it with black liquitex acrylic or sylicone or tape or I do not know, it is broken, cut, dust, ash...
    I have to replace it. I thought that a good idea should be to buy a new used one (ebay) and then replace it. Do you know how to do it?
    There are rivets that bond the bellow to the lensboard and rivets that bond bellow and back. And when I see rivets I have to ask for help...
    Thank you
    Best Regards
    Trent

    I posted this also at photo.net, hope this not break any rule.
     
  2. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    Half a reply - I have the dilemma of how to REPLACE removed, stretched or missing rivets.

    Removing them on less $ Polaroids like 95b, 105, 160, 800 for experiments, I ground and drilled them out.

    But this doesn't completely answer your question.

    Murray
     
  3. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    Another thought, or two...

    If you have a replacement bellows, and if you are ready to replace it, with some thought you could use contact cement. A number of non-Polaroid folders I took apart had a layer of some semi-rigid fiber with a clearance hole to pass the lens/shutter body, to flatten the front of the bellows against the back of the front folding standard.

    A small number glue the bellows to the standard. I found that contact cement come off very easily with some brand (I can't remember) of automotive "Bug & Tar Remover", so I would consider gluing it reversible. Now a vinyl bellows I would hesitate to subject to solvents and adhesives.

    I was able to remove the back door & roller assemblies from several old rollfilm Polaroids
    but cannot recall satisfactorily finding how to remove an old belows.

    Murray

    Murray
     
  4. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    I started another thread on what to do about rivets in folders. A fair amount of discussion and substance, but no source yet.

    M
     
  5. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    I found a few sources of 1/16" diameter flat head rivets. One setting method is a modified 'automatic' center punch (custom tip) with a block of metal underneath supported by a vise.

    I picked up some rivets, brass rod & tubing today at a hardware store to see what I can do to replace my rivets.

    Murray
     
  6. Alexander Grillon

    Alexander Grillon Member

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    It is not easy.
    The bellow is fragile and it is glued and trapped under the metal frame. You need to bend it. And to bend it is a difficult operation. Then you have to bend it back to the original shape.
     
  7. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    I found taking a Polaroid 150 apart much more difficult than an Agfa Ventura 69 (see http://uptowngallery.org/Murray/AgfaFilet/ ).

    I was able to get access to the bellows on the Agfa, but my goal wasn't to put it back together. It wasn't on the Polaroid either, however, which was built like a tank (and the Agfa being more like a VW).

    Someone at Polaroid must have planned for serviceability on those cameras, but they seem pretty impenetrable to me, reversability-wise.

    Murray