Reusing chemical bottles for food

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by BetterSense, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    I have 4 Grolsch bottles that I used to use for fixer. Now that I am brewing my own beer, I would like to use them for beer. I think that since they are glass, there should be no problem if I wash them out well and put new gaskets on the lids. But then I wanted to see what other people thought just in case.
     
  2. Роберт

    Роберт Member

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    I think a very bad idea.

    And also using food bottles for chemicals too.

    BTW: Grolsch is situated in Holland and even I am using Schott chemical bottles for putting in chemicals.

    If you will have an accident by swapping food and chemicals and children are involved you will never ask this again. :redface:
     
  3. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear BetterSense,

    My brain tells me you should have no problem. My gut tells me bottles are cheap enough to just get new ones. I have nothing really to stand on here, but I wouldn't re-use them.

    Neal Wydra
     
  4. L Gebhardt

    L Gebhardt Subscriber

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    Follow your name, and have better sense than to put your beer in your old chemical bottles.
     
  5. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    Wow!
    I've always thought all the warnings on things were a bit excessive. As your friends finish those bottles of beer, tell them what was stored in them beforehand. Make sure your health insurance is up to date first.
     
  6. Tim Gray

    Tim Gray Member

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    Ditto. Why reuse them? You can buy new bottles for pretty cheap. And if you don't want to buy empty ones, go buy a couple filled with beer. Enjoy the beer and now you have new bottles.
     
  7. zsas

    zsas Member

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    Not worth the risk
     
  8. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    It is sooo much better to buy fresh ones and empty the contents into the appropriate recepticle(belly) and reuse for more beer.
     
  9. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    The thing is I don't like Grolsch and I don't even know where to buy it.
     
  10. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    is it april 1 already ?
     
  11. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Wha...:blink:
     
  12. Monito

    Monito Member

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    Silver is a heavy metal. Heavy metals can be poisonous. Some weird unscientific "remedies" use silver solutions, but they only get grandfathered into the rules; they have never been FDA approved.

    If you turn blue due to silver poisoning, please don't complain here.

    Did you start this thread after consuming your home brew?
     
  13. mgb74

    mgb74 Subscriber

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    Flip top bottles are available at virtually any homebrew shop. Also check craigslist.

    Isn't worth the risk.
     
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  15. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Beg all your friends to save their Grolsch bottles for you.
     
  16. kevs

    kevs Member

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    Are you really that hard up?

    Like re-used pickle jars, your bottles will probably retain the smell of fixer. Also, I've found that silver tends to plate the glass after a while, which you might not see if the layer's very thin. You'd be better off to buy more beer in glass bottles and use those; besides you can have more fun with the contents! :smile:
     
  17. Worker 11811

    Worker 11811 Member

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    No matter how many times it's been washed, would you ever eat soup from a chamber pot?
     
  18. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    too funny ...

    last week when it was suggested to keep photochemistry out of the reach of children because developer and fixer were harmful to one's health ...
    ... it seemed "kooky" ---- "children were being protected" = "nanny state" &c

    now ... when an adult asks if it is ok to reuse fixer-jars for beer
    it is OK to say that photochemistry is harmful to one's health ?? :munch:

    too funny :whistling:
     
  19. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    :whistling:
     
  20. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Chemicals that may contact the skin are one thing, but those that might be ingested are another. Even in trace amounts, you should NOT take any chance of ingesting photographic chemicals. Silver metal and silver salts are used as topical bacteriocides, but are poison if swallowed.

    This is a supremely unwise idea.

    Do not use any cooking utensil for holding photochemicals either. Do not use a cooking pot or measuring cup for chemistry that might ever be used for food!

    PE
     
  21. Dave in Kansas

    Dave in Kansas Member

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    Oh oh. I have sinned. I used one of my wife's mixing bowls for mixing my last batch of Xtol. Guess I won't do that anymore.

    Dave
     
  22. Worker 11811

    Worker 11811 Member

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    Okay... Show of hands... How many of us remember a high school or college chemistry teacher who drank his coffee out of a Pyrex beaker?

    Or, better yet, how many of us have been chemistry teachers who drank their coffee from Pyrex beakers?

    :D :D :D
     
  23. MattCarey

    MattCarey Member

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    All my photo stuff that is food-like (e.g. pitchers) are marked "Not for food/Photo only" with a sharpie.

    I don't want them recycled and somehow end up in someone else's kitchen someday. I don't want to ever ask myself, "is this one that I used for photo?" (even though I don't use anything similar in my kitchen for just this reason).
     
  24. MattCarey

    MattCarey Member

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    I don't know what your point it. That conversation was pretty clearly tending towards respect for photo chemicals.

    This conversation is trending the same way.

    You can put your popcorn away.
     
  25. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    We drank from pyrex beakers sometimes even at EK. But, we had dedicated coffee beakers and dedicated chemistry beakers. The company even supplied us with food and chemical refrigerators, and no food was allowed in labs, just office areas. Refrigerators for chemicals were modified for use with chemicals, as the auto defrost equipment could actually start a fire or cause an explosion. And, to prove it, they demonstrated how by blowing the door off a commercial refrigerator in the middle of a field.

    So, don't store solvents or chemicals in a food fridge.

    PE
     
  26. Worker 11811

    Worker 11811 Member

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    Yes, my teacher's "coffee mug" rarely varied off the path between his desk and the teacher's lounge but, even if it did, it never went as far as the lab.

    I often use empty food containers like snap-top margarine tubs and plastic milk jugs in the darkroom because they are free and plentiful. I can use them a couple-few times and, when they get icky, I can throw them into the recycle bin. There are always new ones to take their place.

    These containers are always labeled with their contents but, most importantly, the path from kitchen to darkroom to recycle bin is always a one way street.

    Nowadays, if you blew the door off a fridge, you could easily get 1,000,000 hits on YouTube! :D