Rodagon vs. Componon

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by luxikon, Oct 26, 2008.

  1. luxikon

    luxikon Member

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    Can someone tell me whether the Rodagon 5.6/150 or the Componon 5.6/150 is the better enlarging lens?

    luxikon
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Both are excellent lenses, there's no real differences. The Componon may be older as it was replaced by the Componon S.

    Ian
     
  3. Lee L

    Lee L Member

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    Ctein rates enlarger lenses in his book "Post Exposure". He doesn't include any lenses in his list that he doesn't consider excellent. Both the Rodagon and the Componon-S are in the list and have identical flare, falloff, and distortion numbers in his tests. The Rodagon has "some longitudinal color at f:5.6" and the Schneider has "slight longitudinal color". The sharpness of both is rated the same relative to the sharper 135 Rodagon. The Schnieder has the "best contrast of 4x5 lenses", and the Rodagon has "good contrast" at f:8. Optimal aperture for both is f:8.

    It's unclear if you are considering the Componon or the Componon-S. Ctein's tests are of the -S version.

    Lee
     
  4. luxikon

    luxikon Member

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    @ Lee

    I am considering the Componon, not the -S type.
     
  5. jeroldharter

    jeroldharter Member

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    I have a Schneider Apo-Componon and a Rodenstock Rodagon 150 mm f5.6 lens. Both seem quite good. The Schneider Apo takes a special lens board with my Beseler enlarger and as a result it is harder (? impossible) to align perfectly because it has subtle give/wobble in the connection to the enlarger. Therefore, on my enlarger, I am currently using the Rodagon and am quite happy with it. This is for B&W.
     
  6. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    The plain Componon is also excellent I have 5 or 6, maybe more in various sizes. I also have two older Rodagons and 2 Componon-S, it's difficult/impossible to find any differences in the print quality between any of the lenses. Buy which ever is the newest of the two.

    Ian
     
  7. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    No :smile:
     
  8. mikebarger

    mikebarger Member

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    Why mess with those dogs, get a Nikon. :wink:

    Mike
     
  9. Martin Aislabie

    Martin Aislabie Subscriber

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    Both could be excellent lenses - and are when new

    However, if you have the chance to physically examine them look for wear and scratches then put them on an enlarger and check for focus shift.

    I have a Componon-S which focus shifts ever so slightly - no doubt it suffered a drop or similar in its life time - so now has been retired to be a perfectly adequate paper weight

    Martin
     
  10. jordanstarr

    jordanstarr Member

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    I've used both and not noticed the difference. If you get an APO lens, then you might notice the difference.

    ...Jordan.
     
  11. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    EL-Nikkors are undoubtedly good. Are they better than Rodagons or Componon S lenses? Probably not. Are they as good as the competition? Yes.

    Schneider's line of current and former enlarging lenses are designated, in order of lowest to highest quality, Componar, Componon, and APO Componon. Rodenstock's designations are Rogonar, Rogonar S, Rodagon, and APO Rodagon. APO designated enlarging lenses are optimized for high enlargement ratios and are designed to be used at very close to wide open apertures. Unless regularly plan to make enlargements of greater than 10x to 12x and larger, the benefits of this type of lens are not apparent. EL-Nikkors don't use similar designations, but the only "budget quality" enlarging lenses are the 4 element 50 mm f/4 and the similar 75 mm optics. An enlarging lens from any of these manufacturers beyond the budget priced models will be excellent and anyone will be hard pressed to notice differences in a print made with any of them. Even the buget priced lenses are good as long as you keep the enlargement ratios modest, and stop the lens down to its optimal working aperture.

    Point is, don't worry so much about the brand name. I've a mix of El-Nikkors (both budget and better), Componons, Rogonars, and Rodagons in my darkroom. All of them are better than good. So you can argue minutiae all you want, but the results on the baseboard in practice are what counts.
     
  12. laurent35

    laurent35 Member

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    I first started with 2 el-nikkor lenses. I bought afterwards 2 Componon lenses (no APO nor -S) and I never used the nikon again and sold them. I don't want to say that the nikon were not good, but the componon gives more richer texture, richer grays. Let me tell you that the conjonction of a planar taking the the picture and a schneider lens for the enlargement gives really fantastics results.
    Laurent