Rollei Classic 400

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Captain Bedworthy, Feb 8, 2008.

  1. Captain Bedworthy

    Captain Bedworthy Member

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    Hi all. I'm recently over from that other photo forum page. I like this one better since no digiphiles cluttering it up with irrelevant discussions about 'noise'.

    Here's my first inquiry:
    I bought a 12 roll box of Rollei Classic 400 120, and unless I find a way of drying it so it won't curl into a tube I'm going to crack them all open and ship them back fogged.

    Really frustrating for this HP5+ user that was interested in a film that was suspected to be APX400 repacked, but isn't. I know that film well and the base never did this, and it takes only 9min @ 68˚ whereas the APX400 takes 11 in ID-11 stock.
    (It's Macophot 400 if it's anything)

    So my question is how do I salvage the other 11 rolls of this stuff?
    It won't even allow itself to lie flat when I sleeve it, so I have to cut the frames individually and use an Anti Newton Glassed Carrier to print it. Big hassle. Any help would be appreciated and thanks.
    CB.
     
  2. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    The Rollei Classic 400 120 size film IS Agfapan 400 emulsion, but it is not coated on as thick a base as normal 120 film, rather it was cut from a master roll intended for 35mm film production.

    There are several things you can do to minimize curling. 1. wind the film onto the developing reel in the reverse direction of the curl. That would be emulsion out, rather than in. 2. Don't over fix in hardening fixer, or try fixing in a non-hardening fixer, just be sure to keep your wash water close to 68f. 3. Hang film to dry with a weight at the bottom. 4. Sleeve your negatives in a page sleeve and put it under several heavy books for a few days.

    Even with extremely curly film, I have been able to coax the strips into page sleeves. Once in the sleeves, under a few books for a few days, most film will flatten out. In worse case situation, I suppose you "could" dry the film on the reel, wound in opposite direction to curl..that is emulsion out.
     
  3. Captain Bedworthy

    Captain Bedworthy Member

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    That might do it

    Thanks, I have some straight Hypo crystals I've been meaning to use. I do typically use the Acid Hardening fixer I used in student days since it's what I'm used to. I have them under books as suggested, but a week or so? I want an oompa-loompa NOW! Drying in the reel reversed is a very risky idea, I like it.
    I'll try both, and thanks for the info much. Really having a blast here on APUG already, reading the signatures folks leave. Here's mine from my other forums and my emails. Cheers!
    CB
     
  4. Bob Eskridge

    Bob Eskridge Member

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    The film most likely is on a polyester base which is also stronger, more dimensionally stable and more archival. In fact, from my perspective, I went back to roll film when polyester based films came available.

    Rollei says hang the film to dry with a "heavy" weight at the bottom to cut down on curling.
     
  5. Bob Eskridge

    Bob Eskridge Member

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    Freestyle's website says that this film uses a tri-acetate base. So I may be off here.
     
  6. cmo

    cmo Member

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    That sounds like chinese Lucky 100 film - I tried that stuff and I hated it after one single roll. It curls so strongly it might crack the anti newton glass in the enlarger :D

    If you are looking for a APX 400 replacement, why not try good old Tri-X?
     
  7. Captain Bedworthy

    Captain Bedworthy Member

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    Good old Tri-X Grr.

    Nothing good comes in a yellow box.
    Anyone in the business who has spent a lot of time on the phone with those d¡nks knows the meaning of suffering.
    Ever stood downwind of Eastman Gelatine?
     
  8. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    Captain Bedworthy??? I gots to know where that name came from.

    At least I *THINK* I want to know :smile:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 8, 2008
  9. P C Headland

    P C Headland Subscriber

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    I get the curls with Efke 25 and 100, no matter how I dry it.

    What I do to flatten it is, after drying, put the film in a negative sleeve and reverse roll it. I then put the tightly wound film in a plastic 120 film container (which handily comes with each roll of Efke/Adox) and leave it for a couple of days or so. That gets it nice and flat.
     
  10. cmo

    cmo Member

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    There are many people that like Kodak films - but why don't you just stick with HP5+ if you like it?