Rollei Crossbird and E-6

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Big_Lynx, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. Big_Lynx

    Big_Lynx Member

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    Hi,

    after some time spent on Internet investigation I am still not sure what is purpose of Crossbird. I understand that processing the film in C-41 will give some "unexpected" effects (in general green dominated colors with proper skin color) but what is going to happen when processing Crossbird as E-6? Should I receive good positive slides?

    I have one roll of Crossbird with important shots. What I want is to have pictures as good as possible - rather real then dominated by effects. Should I develop it in E-6 instead of "recommended" C-41?:sad:
     
  2. thegman

    thegman Member

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    I'd probably develop E6 then. Cross processing can be grainy, and exposure can be iffy. I enjoy cross processed effects, but if you just want photos without the effects, process E6. Maybe try to find out what film this actually is, it's probably something like Elite Chrome, Agfa Precisa, or another cheap(ish) slide film.
     
  3. Big_Lynx

    Big_Lynx Member

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    I was trying hard - no information ... especially for manufacturer
     
  4. thegman

    thegman Member

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    Should not matter too much, assuming you exposed it at box speed, you should just be able to get regular E6 processing and get good results.
     
  5. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    I remember looking at this wierd film while in freestyle. I had never seen Rollei's retro line of films bafore encountering it that day a month ago.

    You may want to shoot a less important roll and proces it as E6 first to see how it reacts.

    I seem to recall thinking that some of them may have been e-6 emulsion coated onto a c-41 base to make it easier to print as ra-4.
     
  6. ath

    ath Member

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  7. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    While I've never done crossprocessing, I thought one was meant to expose different to the box-speed-for-E6. However on googling it, I find recommendations both for underexposure and for overexposure and neither with much credibility or evidence to back them up; the recommendations are probably film-specific since there are such film-specific changes in hue and contrast. So while Crossbird will be marked with a particular box speed that will give good results in C41, that may or may not be a good exposure if you want to soup it in E-6.

    I think that you will need to shoot a test roll first to see what exposures work for you with that particular film. And of course, you have to hope like hell that your two rolls of Crossbird aren't different emulsions as I get the impression that they just repackage any old cheap E-6 film they can get their hands on.
     
  8. Big_Lynx

    Big_Lynx Member

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    Agva Aviphot Chrome 200 was regular E-6 film and MACO PHOTO distributed it as ROLLEI DIGIBASE CR 200 PRO.. Should I assume that Crossbird is just the same as Digibase CR 200 with label ... also for C-41? Frankly speaking I want to develop my particular Crossbird roll and forget about "creative" ideas from Rollei. What I want is to have best possible real results
     
  9. ath

    ath Member

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    That's my understanding. The only reason for the C41 on the can seems to be to get the film developed as C41 (i.e. crossed) in labs that do not know what crossing is.
     
  10. Film-Niko

    Film-Niko Member

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    Yes, it is exactly so.
    Rollei Crossbird = Rollei Digibase CR200 = Agfa Aviphot Chrome 200 = old Agfa RSX II 200 emulsion
    I have used the films and they are the same.

    Then forget this film and use instead Fuji Provia 400X:
    Provia 400X has much better colors (very natural and accurate, whereas the Rollei has a significant yellow cast),
    much much finer grain (the Rollei film is the most grainy slide film on the market),
    much higher resolution and much better sharpness.
    And the Fuji is much more versatile: Double speed, and even excellent pushed to 800 and 1600.
     
  11. Big_Lynx

    Big_Lynx Member

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    sure - and this is what I am doing on regular base. Fuji for E-6 and Kodak Ektar for C-41. The problem is that I was in the situation having in my bag only this "creative" Crossbird free for shots and choice to make or to do not make shots. Now I am not sure how to squeeze best results from this Rollei gadget
     
  12. bblhed

    bblhed Member

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    That film is regular AFGA E-6 film, and while I am a Kodak shooter, I have heard good things about AFGA films. As long as you shot that film at the correct speed and did everything else as you would have for regular E-6 shooting you should be able to get good slides form that film if you process it as E-6.

    Now here is the problem, if the film cassette is marked "process C-41" you may have a problem getting it processed in E-6 I don't know how LOMO marks their cassettes. Some places can be really picky and will only run the film as marked. If that is the case, you can always re-spool the film into a cassette marked E-6 then send out for processing, or even better, just process it yourself and save that trouble.

    FYI: I will tell you that the place I have my C-41 done at checks every cassette before they put it into the machine, they look especially close at anything they never before, or don't see often. I know this because when I brought in my first roll of new Portra they wanted to check it before I even filled out the envelope. I do a lot of business with these people and they know I know my processes quite well, but they have a fairly "trust no one" policy that makes them one of the best drug store drop off places I know of.
     
  13. Big_Lynx

    Big_Lynx Member

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    Super - than I will go for E-6. The lab troubles is not the case for me as I do process film by myself. Tetenal E-6 or C-41 on JOBO CPE
     
  14. SimonD

    SimonD Member

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    I'm very interested to hear how this comes out. Crossbird is about the only colour film available in the UK for 127 format (apart from old stock) and I have a roll that I'm going to use soon in my Yashica 44.I'm hoping it's good as a straight slide film!

    Regards,
    Simon
     
  15. wblynch

    wblynch Member

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    I am anxious to hear about, or see, your results as I also have a Y44a and other 127 cameras.

    This is very exciting for us lonely 127 users. (Ilford, Fuji and Kodak have no care for us)
     
  16. Big_Lynx

    Big_Lynx Member

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    I developed Crossbird in Tetenal E-6. Whole film was exposed for 30 min in the same place therefore only one frame is presented as others differ from each other only by photographed persons. Sample you may find here - http://www.flickr.com/photos/big_lynx/6114108300/in/photostream

    Remarks:

    * I would like to confirm that Crossbird is CR-200. The film is marked as CR 200 (http://www.macodirect.de/). This means that Crossbird = CR200 and only Maco knows why Crossbird is 1EURO more expensive than CR200 :-;
    * Crossbird 120 is very curly and has hard and thick film base
    * Colors are very vivid-ed and dominated by warm (yellow) tone. Pictures are of high contrast
    * Film is very clean for chemistry not putting visible influence on working solutions
     
  17. wblynch

    wblynch Member

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    Can we get CR-200 in 127 size?

    Your sample looks great. Has a kind of "Ferrania" look to it.
     
  18. Film-Niko

    Film-Niko Member

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    Crossbird = CR 200.
    Crossbird is offered in 127 format.
    Alternative for 127 slide film shooters are the respooled 120 Fuji films offered in the US (at B&H for example).
     
  19. Big_Lynx

    Big_Lynx Member

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