Rolleiflash

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Two23, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. Two23

    Two23 Member

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    I've been using a 1951 Rolleiflex MX-EVS with f3.5. I love the camera! In winter I am mostly a night shooter. I just bought a Rolleiflash and want to get started in flashbulbs. I have a dozen M2B bulbs. I usually shoot HP5. I'm thinking the M2B are GN=80? Second question I have is about the flash units themselves. The flash I have has a plastic reflector and the cord simply attaches. There is a GN/exposure calculator wheel on the back, and the reflector adjusts for wide or narrow angle. It take the flat Eveready 412 battery (I just bought a new one.) I'm thinking this is vintage early 1960s? THere is another Rolleiflash bulb gun that has a reel inside that winds up the sync cord. It looks older. Is this one from the 1950s? What is the main difference from a user's POV? Finally, I read the sync for the M2B bulbs is 1/30s, X position. I read that the M3 bulbs can sync 1/60s to 1/500s, x position. Will I need an adapter to use these? What does it look like?


    Kent in SD
     
  2. BMbikerider

    BMbikerider Member

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    This is going back some years, bulbs I didn't know they still made them for flash! As far as I am aware a flash bulb sync's at all speeds with a leaf shutter so long as the connection is in the 'M' position. I may be wrong, and if so I appologise, but I am talking of knowledge that has sat on the shelves inside my brain for 40+ years just gathering dust.
     
  3. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

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    there were a lot of different types of bulbs -- the most common sold for consumer use were made to be used at "M" synch setting, which fires the bulb but delays the shutter a titch until the bulb has reached its brightest point and can be used at all shutter speeds on a rolleiflex or any camera with that type of shutter. "X" synch for strobe fires the bulb the instant that the shutter is wide open because with a strobe/electronic flash there is no delay.

    M2B bulbs are the same as M2 bulbs only blue to balance the light for color film. M3 bulbs, looking at some auctions on ebay, look similar to M2, probably have a different flash power.

    Flash bulbs were a lot brighter than strobe flash and allow for a smaller lens opening, although I suspect some of that is because the bulb burns longer than a strobe flash.

    There was also MF bulbs, which were designed for use with focal plane shutter cameras and could synch at all shutter speeds because they burned longer. Most bulbs, like those m2 ones, had to be used at a slow shutter speed with a focal plane shutter.

    certainly no shortage of bulbs for sale http://www.ebay.com/sch/Vintage-Movie-Photography-/3326/i.html?_nkw=sylvania+flashbulbs+m3
     
  4. Frank C

    Frank C Member

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    If your Rolleiflex is a 1951 model, it is a MX. The MX-EVS ran from 1954-1956. As to the Rolleiflash 1 flash gun, it was mfg. from 1949-1959. I use Sylvania Blue Dot Press 25B bulbs in mine.
     
  5. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    The blue (daylight balanced) bulbs are approx 1 stop less light than the clear bulb.

    But remember that GN is also a function of reflector type. GN for M2B in a polished bowl is 120. In a flatter typre reflector it is a bit more than 80.

    ... and don't forget about efficiency compensation if flashing at speeds above 1/50 or so.
     
  6. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    ... and don't forget about efficiency compensation if flashing at speeds above 1/50 or so.