Rolleiflex filters

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by seaninsurrey, Mar 6, 2008.

  1. seaninsurrey

    seaninsurrey Member

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    I've just purchased my first MF camera (a rolleiflex) which came with a H-1 filter. Is anyone able to tell me if this is sufficient as a UV filter (I always thought they were blue and this is slightly red I think). I'm shooting Fujichrome slide film. Thanks in advance, Sean
     
  2. Matus Kalisky

    Matus Kalisky Member

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    Well - I have one such a filter too, but keep it on the viewing lens (I actually do not know why :smile: ).

    Anyhow - the filter that is supposed to cut the UV should be eiter clear (== colorless) as you do not see the UV or if it should act as a skyfilter than it might be (and actually is) slightly red when viewed agains a white backgorund. This is as expected - if you cut a small part of the blue color of the light spectrum (let's say a white one) - the resiluting spetrum will be slightly reddish. The more blue you cut the more reddish the remaining light (filter) will appear. Look at any of the 81 filters (81A, 81B etc) - they are reddish as they are used to warm the photo up if you photograph in a colder light (open shade or at higher altitudes).

    I think you should be more concerned with the cotaing of the filter. The Rolleiflex filters are mostly rather old and (I guess) single coated. I have even one filter called "Agfacolor" from Rolleiflex that is not coated at all. Lenshood should be your friend :smile:

    You can get new filters from Heliopan, though they cost a bit.
     
  3. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

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    I have never personally shot color trans with my Rollei but as I understand it the Xenotar, or at least the older 3.5 Xenotars (pre F and early F) are pretty cold in color. Much cooler than the Planar. If that is what you got then you might look into a warming filter even stronger than the H-1.
     
  4. Steve Roberts

    Steve Roberts Member

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    Off topic, but in a similar vein. Having had a Rolleiflex for two years I've finally got organised and had it repaired by Michael Spencer of Clay Cross (usual excellent service). Thus, I am also about to enter the world of MF for the first time, albeit with BW materials and a yellow filter (and lens hood, of course!)

    That's unless, of course, Duo 620 counts as MF......

    Steve
     
  5. seaninsurrey

    seaninsurrey Member

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    Thanks for the replies everyone - the lens is a Tessar, if this makes any difference!
     
  6. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

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    Normally a UV filter will have just a hint of red in it to counter the excessive blue that UV light tends to give particularly under cloud. UV can be a problem at altitude, by the sea, and in cloudy conditions. It's generally worse around the middle ofthe day. As with all things photographic you should experiment and compare.