Room temperature C-41 for old E-2 Ektachrome EX?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by hpulley, Jul 28, 2011.

  1. hpulley

    hpulley Member

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    I picked up, among other things in a lot of old film, a roll of Ektachrome EX 620. I could just throw the film away and use the spool for reloading fresh 120... or I can retape the old thing since the tape is always dead on film this old (sure was on the roll of Super XX I just loaded) and give it a try for 8 exposures in my Kodak Tourist folder.

    Is it worth trying room temperature C-41 on the old E-2 process film? I'd love to get some color prints off it even if it would be shifted and grainy but if the dyes are doing to be dead then I could try HC-110 instead. Anyone have development times for room temperature C-41 for E-2 film? Or for room temperature HC-110?
     
  2. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Save the spool. Color film this old will be so fogged as to be uselss.
     
  3. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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    It's not useless and could be completely recovered with a few tricks pre-exposure. But for only just 1 roll... kinda shooting in the dark there.. pun intended.
     
  4. hpulley

    hpulley Member

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    It's 64 ISO so not fast. Some old Anscochrome I tried came out blank in room temp C-41 so perhaps I'd just be wasting my tim$e again but I'll see how adventurous I'm feeling.

    Yep, just one roll.

    Thanks.
     
  5. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    I hope your statement was meant to be sarcastic. People may not be aware of how old the E-2 process is and therefore how old this film really must be? Kodak discontinued the process in 1966 and the film must be older. Perhaps Harry Potter could use some trick like filmus repairus. :smile:

    Thie film may be older than most APUG members.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 29, 2011
  6. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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    I've been experimenting with gas-bleaching recently, seems to work. Characteristics altered, but fog-be-gone.
     
  7. David Lyga

    David Lyga Subscriber

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    Old film? I have a 100 ft roll of Tri-X that I bought from a camera show about 10 years ago. I was only one dollar. Why? Its expiration date was 1958. Its current speed is about 25 but it does work and the fog level is manageable.

    Also, I have some of a 100 ft roll of Vericolor that I bought about 1980. Since then, room temp but if I expose at about 25 it, again, works. Dense negs but they do print well. Old film does not die if you are not spoiled with clearest base film. - David Lyga
     
  8. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Athiiril, David,

    I think the point here is whether most people would want to bother. How bad must the film become before it's considered no longer useable.