rubber lens hoods

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by rmolson, Feb 6, 2010.

  1. rmolson

    rmolson Member

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    Rubber lens hoods


    I am not quite sure where to post this but I’ll try repair. I use collapsible rubber lens hoods on my lenses. It ‘s good physical protection as well as a sunshade. Working with short zooms on the wide angle setting I collapse the shade. But eventually the continued working of the shade causes the rubber to wear and crack. Years ago when I worked in a printing plant the pressmen used s solution to rejuvenate the rubber rollers. And it extended their life, On a four color press there are a lot of rollers and they represent a considerable amount of money. So keeping them in good working condition was vital. The stuff came in one gallons cans and smelled to high heaven , but kept the roller soft and unglazed. I just wonder if anyone has ever used something similar to keep rubber pliable in reasonable sizes.
     
  2. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    Rubber lens hoods are cheap enough to replace every 30 years whether they need to be or not. :0

    Seriously, my hoods seem to last a very long time without any problems. When they shoiw signs of deterioration, I buy a new one for $10. At that price, a ten year rental is a buck a year, very low overhead I'd say.

    I'll bet that solution is a petrolium based oil that will swell the rubber. If it stinks that much, I doubt you'd want to use it on your camera... ah that fresh outdoors aroma of the New Jersey Turnpike.
     
  3. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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    I believe there are products, as you describe, that will help prolong the life of rubber if used periodically from the start. However, despite claims, I've never found anything that will actually rejuvenate old rubber once it has become deteriorated. Best solution I believe, as mentioned, is get a new one.

    Now if you want to give a try, I participate in a vintage motorcycle forum and this comes up quite regularly as you might imagine. Some 'claim' success using wintergreen oil. Good luck with it, let us know how it goes.
     
  4. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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  5. MikeSeb

    MikeSeb Member

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    Uh, Armor-All?
     
  6. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    If you go to automotive stores there are all kinds of rubber restorer. I have a can of silicone spray that works well for restoring surfaces. Once rubber gets to a point where it is cracking and weakening, there is nothing you can do. Unless you have the "stuff" already, I really think it's your best option to purchase the new hood.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 6, 2010
  7. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    With the price of rubber lens hoods being so low, why would you want to subject yourself and equiptment to chemical fumes. You will probably spend more to treat them than to just buy a new one every 10-20 years. My cheapest hood finally tore after 25 years, I think I paid five or six bucks for it back then. I just looked at my 20+ year old Tiffen hoods, and they are still in great shape.

    Sounds like a case of tripping over dollars to pick up a nickel.

    Rick