safelight question

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by marcsv, Aug 27, 2006.

  1. marcsv

    marcsv Member

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    will a red safelight affect polymax rc and polymax II rc?
     
  2. glennfromwy

    glennfromwy Member

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    Well, I don't use Polymax but I do use a red safelight for everything. No problems.
     
  3. nlochner

    nlochner Member

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    The manufacturer of the paper, i think polymax is kodak (correct me if i'm wrong) usually puts a piece of paper inside the box of paper giving you the data for the photo paper, including develop stop fix and wash times, and if you look closely, they usually say something like red safelite 102 or amber safelite 321 up to 4 feet away is safe.

    Hopefully this helps, and i agree with glennfromwy, that from my personal experiences, red safelites never fog my paper.

    nlochner
     
  4. marcsv

    marcsv Member

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    A friend said that I should use an Amber filter (kodak OC I think) rather than a red one. I'm not too sure about the difference between the two in terms of enlarging paper handling.
     
  5. clogz

    clogz Subscriber

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  6. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I was always under the impression that red is the "safest" safelight.

    The best bet is to do a test. Set an opaque object on the paper and expose it to your safelight for a period of time that is, say, three times longer than the paper would be out under normal circumstances. Develop it, and see if you made a pictograph. If you didn't, your safelight is safe.
     
  7. donbga

    donbga Member

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    Not so. Some require handling under OC Amber filters.
     
  8. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Thanks Don, that had been my impression because I have paper that says "red only" haven't had "amber only" yet. Interesting business this stuff.
     
  9. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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    I only have a red safelight but I have not had any problems with any papers which recommend an amber safelight.


    Steve.
     
  10. Jim Jones

    Jim Jones Subscriber

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    If amber is safe, red is safer.
     
  11. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Member

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    In general, red is 'safer' than amber (OC), but there are different reds. There is light red (#1A), red (#1) and dark red (#2). Dark red is 'safe' enough to work even with orthomatically sensitized emulsions (some Foma papers), but it isn't very bright. I have tested them to be 'safe' up to 16 minutes. Light red should be safer than amber from a wavelength point of view, but it is very bright, and I haven't found them to be 'safe' beyond 2 minutes. Red (#1) and amber (OC) are both good for regular emulsions, with red being safer than OC if you can stand the red light in the darkroom. To be sure, you should test with your paper, and if in doubt or more time is required, add some paper (from the outside!) as a neutral density filter.