Salt Prints and density of negatives

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by Jerevan, Aug 12, 2006.

  1. Jerevan

    Jerevan Subscriber

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    As far as I understand, salt prints need a great deal of density, something between 1.6 and up to 2.6. How do I get that kind of density? Would just overdeveloping the negs (made specially for this process) make me come any closer? And how much would that be? 70-80% overdeveloping?

    I have seen the enlarged negative reversal process (Liam Lawless' process) but it involves quite a few steps and a bunch of chemicals I can't get my hands on.

    Staining developers seems also to be out, as I am not that keen on using pyro and can't find the metol needed, either. There doesn't seem to be any staining developer that does not use pyro of some sort.

    What kind of other alternatives are there?
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Well, my choice for albumen is ABC pyro, which doesn't use metol, but it does use pyrogallol, obviously. Hydroquinone is a staining developer in formulas that have a low sulfite content.

    On the other hand, I've gotten enough density out of old TMX and D-76 (1+1) with a sufficiently extended development time. Unfortunately, new TMX isn't suitable due to the UV absorbing layer, but you could try it with your film of choice.

    I find that my normal development times for albumen are about the same as N+2 for silver gelatin prints. If you need more density, you could try selenium intensification--Kodak Rapid Selenium Toner 1+3 for about 8 minutes should get you one zone more density.
     
  3. smieglitz

    smieglitz Member

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  4. Jerevan

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    Good to be reminded of the UV layer of the Kodak films! One has to choose wisely. :smile:

    My films of choice would be either Foma or Efke PL 25 or 100 (which is about what I can find easily in 13x18). It also has to be slow enough to use with a lens cap shutter... I am going to start with a single BL screw-in 125w bulb for printing. I guess exposure times will be rather long.

    Ah, thanks, Joe! I read that thread but managed to miss out on the important info. :D