San Francisco Veihicle restriction?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by ToddB, Jul 19, 2013.

  1. ToddB

    ToddB Member

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    Hey guys,

    really quick.. I leave for San Fran for our trip this Sat. I was thinking.. Is there any restriction for type of vehicles allowed in city limits. We are planning on taking a conversion van. The footprint maybe slightliy larger than a Econoline van but stands a little higher. I realize that finding parking might be a challenge. Just curius if if there is any restrictions. Aimed at Local residents.

    ToddB
     
  2. StoneNYC

    StoneNYC Subscriber

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    Why not call the city and ask them, this is a film forum... The city hall would have that answer most likely.


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    I have driven large vehicles around San Francisco, including box trucks and full size motor homes. There are some streets which are very narrow, the lane width on a few major streets is narrow, and some overheads are low.
    But your conversion van will be fine on the streets. Be careful with underground parking or garages.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 19, 2013
  4. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    You also need a GOOD low gear :unsure:
     
  5. Mark_S

    Mark_S Member

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    No legal restrictions, but parking is not easy. I live 45 minutes south of the city and hardly ever drive into San Francisco - I usually take public transit into the city to avoid the parking hassle. Parking gets more difficult the larger the vehicle!
     
  6. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    Good brakes, too. :wink:
    And when starting from a standstill on a hill, keep your foot on the brake as you give it gas until you feel the van trying to go forward. Otherwise, you could roll into the car behind you before you can react.
     
  7. Prof_Pixel

    Prof_Pixel Member

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    You may have problems in the various parking structures around the city.
     
  8. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    When parking on a hill [READ: everywhere in San Francisco] turn the downhill side of the front wheel to the curb [The curb holds the vehicle from rolling.]. If there is not curb turn the downhill side of the front wheels away from the closest side of the road [If the vehicle were to roll downhill, it will roll off the road and not on to the roadway].

    This will work everywhere and is not restricted to San Francisco.
     
  9. DREW WILEY

    DREW WILEY Member

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    Parking can be hell. Some parallel spaces are made deliberately short, so that anything the size of a delivery van will automatically get a ticket.
    Lots of the parking meters are electronically rigged, so that if you even move your vehicle within the allotted time, you will still get a ticket if
    it's within a radius of several blocks. SF reminds me of that old Boss Hogg TV town where they constantly moved a portable fire hydrant in front
    of cars to ticket them. Another point of caution - bicycle riders in SF can be not only rude but dangerous, and sometimes think they're exempt
    from basic rules of the road. So be cautious of them suddenly cutting in front of you etc. Avoid rush hour. And obviously, downtown and the
    conspicuous tourist areas are a lot more difficult than the residential areas or the beach. Chinatown can be hell to find parking in - best to
    use the garage. But this is largely just a matter of specific difficulties, where knots in traffic occur. A lot of the town is easy to get around in.
     
  10. ROL

    ROL Member

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    When I lived there, one of the first things I was told is that "San Francisco" is Spanish for "new brakes".
     
  11. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    I lived on lower Nob Hill. I used to usually walk or take a bus or cable car because I didn't want to lose my parking space!
     
  12. Tom1956

    Tom1956 Inactive

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    Why am I not surprised?
     
  13. Iluvmycam

    Iluvmycam Member

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    Are you a boondocker? Let me know how it goes.
     
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  15. rorye

    rorye Subscriber

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    You could drive a boat down Market Street and no one would bat an eye!
     
  16. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    There used to be a sign, "No trucks allowed", in china town. Also check on your insurance policy, make sure you're fully covered and up to date. And don't leave valuables in the vehicle!
     
  17. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    And if you don't curb your wheels like this you will get a ticket.
     
  18. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Subscriber

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    This advice about turning the wheels towards the kerb is (or used to be) the advice in the UK's Highway Code (a book of rules and regulations for UK drivers.


    Steve.
     
  19. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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  20. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Actually it is California vehicle code law.
     
  21. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    Maybe so but San Francisco's notorious for giving out those tickets very quickly. Probably due to way more cars per hilly street than most places!
     
  22. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Yes, because it is a public safety concern.
     
  23. Tori Nelson

    Tori Nelson Member

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    Save your sanity (and fenders, side panels etc.). Park outside the city at any BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) station and enjoy the ride. Wear your walking shoes and enjoy one of the few major cities in California where it is enjoyable to walk and everywhere you do, there is something to see. Make sure you go to the Buena Vista for an Irish Coffee; my favorite tourist stop!
     
  24. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    I always enjoyed taking visitors down streets where the sidewalks are actually steps.
     
  25. omaha

    omaha Member

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    Exactly right! A car in the city is more of a millstone than a convenience.
     
  26. wiltw

    wiltw Subscriber

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    San Francisco has meters which go dormant at night, and appear to be non-function if you were to pull up to the meter and park before meter enforcement hours. They will NOT permit you to feed money in advance of enforcement hours, they will simply wake up at the designated time and start to blink 'Violation' until you come back to feed the meter or the parking enforcement arrives and starts writing tickets. That is what I experienced last year, and I was lucky in needing something out of my car, which brought me back two minutes after the meter woke up! However, according to SF official web site, you can now prepay meters for the time you need even if you arrive before the meter begins to be enforced – you will not be charged until the meter begins operation (e.g., at 9 a.m.). Prepayment begins at 4:30 a.m. at all meters every day (except at Port meters near waterfront). (Watch out, I don't know if what the web says is in full implementation! Better safe than sorry.)

    San Francisco has meters which are variable in parking fee rates, based upon demand. Most meter rates are between $2.00 and $3.50 per hour for cars, and city has piloted demand-responsive pricing in SFpark pilot areas, where rates incrementally adjust every 6-8 weeks based on demand and may range from $0.25 to $6.00 per hour.

    As of January 2013, parking meters are in effect all days of the week, including Sundays.

    Watch out for street cleaning signs on which one side of the street cannot have any parking on a certain period for street sweeping...your car WILL be ticketed, the cops precede the street sweepers since it helps reduce the city's income shortfalls!

    Most neighborhoods that are near key routes for mass transit use officially issued neighborhood stickers so that residents can park all day, while other cars are rigidly enforced for 2 hour limit, so that commuters do not take up all the parking all day and prevent residents from parking.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 20, 2013