Sealing / Painting a Darkroom sink

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by david b, May 11, 2006.

  1. david b

    david b Member

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    I've got a Kreonite darkroom sink. It is made of fiberglass. The top side is smooth and feels like plastic.

    Before I put up the walls and make the dark room, I am wanting to paint/seal the sink to make sure I do not have any issues in the future.

    Any suggestions of paint/epoxy? I've called the few marine shops and auto paint places and no one seems to know what I need. I've spoken to several people. It's kind of sad, actually.

    So, is there a product I can get at Lowes or Home Depot?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Wayne

    Wayne Subscriber

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    You might want to look at swimming pool paint. Benjamin Moore makes one, it comes in white or black. Its intended for immersion, and is hard and chemical resistant. I dont know if it would work for this application, but its a thought. I used it on my plywood sink and it has held up well for several years of intermittant use. I'm about to recoat it tonight.

    Oh, its also expensive and has nasty fumes. Do you really need to coat the sink? Sounds like it may not be necessary.


    Wayne
     
  3. Kerik

    Kerik Member

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    I used a marine epoxy paint by West System. http://www.westsystem.com/ My sink is now about 15 years old and gets pretty heavy use. The epoxy has held up very well. I got it at a local marine supply outfit.
     
  4. Peter Schrager

    Peter Schrager Subscriber

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    ditto

    I'm with Kerik on this one. Marine paint holds up really well!
    Peter
     
  5. DBP

    DBP Member

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    I would go with West Systems Epoxy, which is, among other things, used to repair fiberglass. It's pretty easy to work with, but wear gloves and make sure you have good ventilation. You can order it online from West Marine, but any decent chandlery should carry it. (Admittedly such shops may be more common here by the Chesapeake). I wouldn't rush to paint the sink, though. Fiberglass is pretty moisture and stain resistant, which is why they make sinks, showers, and boats from it. Just don't use an abrasive cleaner, as that will scratch the gel coat. The only other thing that bothers gel coat is UV light, which shouldn't be an issue in the case (!).
     
  6. hortense

    hortense Member

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    Kreonite

    According to Kreonite, there sinks are of a one-piece molded glass-fiber reinforced resin construction. This resin was specifically developed to be impervious to the corrosive effects of rapid fixers, color bleaches, iron chloride and other harsh chemicals used in photographic and graphic arts processes.
    See http://dunningphoto.com/k5sink.html
     
  7. david b

    david b Member

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    The problem with the sink is it's age. It's at least 10 years old and the factory stand does not properly support the center of it.

    There are a few (4-5) hairline cracks in the top. It is water tight but I am just taking a precaution.
     
  8. Markauf

    Markauf Member

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    Bondo, (bondo.com) a company that I do business with has products that will help you achieve your goal.
    I have the same sink waiting for a darkroom to be built around it and I'll be using some Bondo products also.

    Mark
     
  9. Peter Schrager

    Peter Schrager Subscriber

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    Marine Tex

    For hairline fractures I recommend MarineTex. You carry it on your boat and while in the water it will seal up a hole. I used it for my ZoneVI washer when it started to fall apart...hardens like cement
    Peter
     
  10. david b

    david b Member

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    I should note....I live in Albuquerque New Mexico. One of the driest places on the planet. We have 3 marine shops and none of the carry supplies.
     
  11. DBP

    DBP Member

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    www.westmarine.com
     
  12. david b

    david b Member

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    Well, here is what I've done and so far, so very good.

    I used an all purpose marine epoxy paste called PC-11 ($5) to fill in the minor hairline cracks. After waiting about 10 hours I sanded them down to a somewhat nice finish.

    Then I used product by Klenks ($30), that is made to refinish fiberglass and plastic tubs. It is a two-part liquid epoxy. It only comes in white so now I have a green and white sink. Who cares?

    I am on my second coat and it looks great. It's also smooth as butter. And yes it is chemical resistant and both items were available at Home Depot.
     
  13. raucousimages

    raucousimages Member

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    Another option is truck bed liner. You can have it sprayed like Rhino lining, Duraliner ETC. They do a great job in several colors and can be sprayed to a smooth finish or there is a roll on version available in black at checker auto.
     
  14. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Member

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    David, I live in rural Kentucky, and it is the same issue. Lots of boats, no place for parts or repair. The internet was my savior when building my darkroom sink.

    I am with the others on this. The West Epoxy or "gelcoat" system is the easiest to apply and best looking. It is also the most expensive. Lots of colors to choose from though...

    Marine paint is an option, as long as it will stick. You may have to lightly sand the surface to make sure that this happens.
     
  15. david b

    david b Member

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    Well, thanks everyone for the input. I will definitely remember this if I build another darkroom and sink.

    For now, this one will work. Now I can move onto the walls.

    Thanks again.