Second E6 developer

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by tiberiustibz, Jan 4, 2009.

  1. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    Does the second E6 developer need to be controlled as closely as kodak says? Could it be used at room temp with no ill effects? Assuming it develops to completion, I see no reason why not unless the temperature interferes with the CD somehow...
     
  2. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    Yes, to avoid color shifts, it needs to be within 1 degree. There may still be third party E-6 processing kits that work at room temperature, but the results won't be as good as Kodak, run as Kodak requires.
     
  3. David Grenet

    David Grenet Member

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    Why not try it with a test roll/strip?

    Oh, and if you do try make sure you let us know!

    Someone on the flickr forums has stand developed C41 at room temp and it doesn't look too bad (and that's definitely not Kodak recommended!) - who knows about colour shifts though...
     
  4. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    With C-41 you can "sorta" correct for off-temperature processing color shifts when you make prints (or scan) if you are not too picky, however a transparency is an end product. Harder to correct for processing flaws.
     
  5. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    I know that the first developer must be closely regulated to prevent cross over, but since the second developer develops to completion, I see no reason why I could not use room temp, except slowing the development.
     
  6. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    It is diffusion dependant, even if going to completion and so can lead to problems. At low temps, who says that the couplers have the same activity or the DIAR fragments have the same diffusion rate? If they change, the crossover and color shifts take place!

    PE
     
  7. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Information on this matter seems confusing.

    Tetenal once stated that for the first developer 1°C variation would yield 0.1 colour density variation and that Kodak's and theirs 0.3°C max tolerance should not deterr you.

    For the first rinse in the Tetenal 3-bath! process the reduced 0.5°C tolerance is stated by Tetenal as crucial as any residue of first developer will be activated in the following high ph CD.
    In a magazine test the temperature of the first rinse for the 6-bath process was reduced even down to 20°C without visible effects.

    For the colour developer Tetenal stated that minor variation of temperature will have no influence and the time may be between 4 and 8 minutes without visible variation in density. However in an attached overview they at the same time even reduce the max. tolerance from Kodak's 1°C to 0.5°C for their 3-bath process...
     
  8. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Kodak tests show that pH, time and temperature will affect the CD if too low or high for pH, too low or too short for temp and time..... This is due to the reaction rates of couplers which have different kinetic responses to these factors. This leads to changes in contrast, dmax and color balance. Kodak's color darkroom dataguide used to show the effects of all of these on E6. IDK if the new book has them.

    PE
     
  9. domaz

    domaz Member

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    My bet is you would see big differences between using the Color Developer at room temp and at 38C. why bother? If you can get the first developer to 38C why not get the Color developer there too? I imagine the Fix could run at room temp if you gave it more time (not Blix or Bleach).
     
  10. tim_walls

    tim_walls Member

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    I don't think this is the dataguide to which you refer, but one of my very few bookmarks is the Kodak Publication Z-119 - Using KODAK Chemicals Process E-6. As found here:
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/business/retailPhoto/techInfo/zManuals/z119.jhtml

    Sections 12 (Visual Troubleshooting of Process E-6), 14 (Diagnostic Charts) and 15 (Control-Chart Examples) are probably the most relevant here.
     
  11. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Tim;

    This is close to the one I have. The one I have has photo examples of many of those. Thanks.

    PE