Sekonic L558

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by Digidurst, May 8, 2005.

  1. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    Hey ya'll :smile: With the forutnate find of a Sekonic L558, I am about to embark on the journey of spot metering. I think I've got the basics down but only practice and experience will carry me through.

    I am curious about some of the advanced functions of the L588, like filter compensation. Do any of ya'll use that feature? I read the manual but you know those things are written so weird it's kinda hard to translate it into real-world applications, at least it is for me.

    So, Sekonic L558 users, tell me your thoughts (please!)

    Thanks!
     
  2. rbarker

    rbarker Member

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    I don't have an L-558, but rather the older L-508. But, I wouldn't see much utility in a filter compensation feature. It would seem quicker to just make the adjustment mentally. Unless, that is, the meter talks to the lens to determine which filter(s) you've added, and already knows the filter factor of each. :wink:
     
  3. colrehogan

    colrehogan Member

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    I have the L-608 and there is a way to dial in the compensation. I use this for when I'm using things like opaque IR filters. Pay close attention as to which sign (+ or -) represents over/underexposure. Mine is opposite of what I would have thought, i.e. - is overexposure and + is underexposure.

    If you're using the spotmeter, then try taking a reading directly through the filter as a practice exercise. You can get an idea of what to expect. Once you have an idea what to expect, you can take a reading normally, and dial in the appropriate compensation.

    Does this make sense?
     
  4. Digidurst

    Digidurst Subscriber

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    No, but that's because I've been hiking about in the sun all day and my brain is fried. I'm sure tomorrow, it'll make perfect sense :smile:
     
  5. NikoSperi

    NikoSperi Member

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    I'm intrigued... how exactly would I dial in a filter factor on my 608? I can set two different ISO's and convert a reading between the two by pushing the ISO 2 button. Is that what you meant, or is there a trick I could learn here?
     
  6. colrehogan

    colrehogan Member

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    You can press ISO 1 and ISO 2 down simultaneously and turn the dial and you'll see a number in brackets on the screen that will go up or down depending on which way you turn the dial. This is your exposure compensation. There's a page in the manual that goes into the numbering system but I'm at work at the moment, so I don't know exactly what page it is.

    Never mind, I just downloaded a copy of the manual from the Sekonic site and the exposure compensation stuff is on page 29.
     
  7. NikoSperi

    NikoSperi Member

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    Ah ha! Thx Diane. I know the rtfm ritual... my problem is the where IS the friggin manual. :rolleyes: Grazie.
     
  8. colrehogan

    colrehogan Member

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  9. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    I've got the 358 which I guess they just added the spot feature on to for the 558. Instead of using filter factors I set the second ISO number to an adjusted film speed. For example if I'm expecting to use a filter with a factor of 2 then I just divide the film speed by 2. ISO 1 will be the normal reading with no filter. ISO 2 will be the one with the filter.
     
  10. Baxter Bradford

    Baxter Bradford Member

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    I have the 508 Cine and measured filter factors for my B+W and Colour Warm up filters using the incident meter with the dome retracted (Difference of meter reading with no filter and meter reading with filter pressed down onto the surface).
    I wrote them down on the front of the Lee filter holder case and apply them manually.
    Easy and quick and permanent.
    The inbuilt function has been unused.......
     
  11. NikoSperi

    NikoSperi Member

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    Baxter,
    That's my method too. The reading I get with the Lee #25 red varies quite a bit according to the light... I've settled on 5x or -2.5 EV. Easy, quick, but quite transient. What did you measure that filter to be, if you have it?
     
  12. Baxter Bradford

    Baxter Bradford Member

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    Niko
    Sorry I can't give a value for the 25, I only have the cheap gel 23A filter which measures at -1.7EV.

    Being B+W it isn't nearly so critical as for Transparency, so hope that your average figure works. Alternatively, suggest using two/three annotated readings for lighting situations which you can recognise.