Sheet Film Processing

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Mitya138, Jul 5, 2012.

  1. Mitya138

    Mitya138 Member

    Messages:
    33
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2011
    Location:
    Tokyo, Japan
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Apologies- this is a really basic question. I've stocked up on Fuji 4x5 Quickloads, but at some point they'll run out and I'll have to go the sheet film route. My question is, how do you take the exposed film in for processing? Are there special envelopes made for that purpose? If so, is it one sheet per, or can several go in one envelope? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,714
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Spare empty film boxes are what are generally used to transport film to the lab.

    If lab is somewhere you walk into, then you can probably bring them loaded film holders and they will unload them for you and return the holders with your processed film./
     
  3. mopar_guy

    mopar_guy Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,176
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2009
    Location:
    Washington,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  4. Jesper

    Jesper Subscriber

    Messages:
    752
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Location:
    Sweden
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Have you considered developing them yourself?
     
  5. Vanishing Point Ent.

    Vanishing Point Ent. Member

    Messages:
    228
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Reuse old boxes & black envelopes...

    The way I was taught was to reuse old boxes & black envelopes that the sheet film came in.

    If you're dividing the exposed stock by the S.B.R., ( Zone System ), build up a number of
    old boxes, put gaffer's tape on them right the S.B.R., on the tape on the box to organize
    the individual sheets.

    NOTE: S.B.R. stands for Subject Brightness Range.
     
  6. Leigh B

    Leigh B Member

    Messages:
    1,033
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Location:
    Maryland, US
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Use all of the original box and packaging materials that the unexposed film came in.
    Put the film back in just as it was originally packaged (minus interleave papers).

    It's wise to use the correct box for the type of film (Acros in an Acros box, FP4+
    in an FP4+ box, etc.) but not mandatory.

    Put a business card on top of the box so the lab won't get it mixed up, and use
    clear packing tape to seal the box, including holding the business card in place.

    Give them a written description of exactly what's in the box, including type and
    number of sheets of film (only one type per box) so they know what to expect.

    I normally put the film box and two copies of the Purchase Order/description
    document in a large zip-lock bag to keep them together.

    They'll normally return all the boxes and packing to you with the processed film,
    but make sure you request that specifically just in case.

    - Leigh
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 15, 2012
  7. Wayne

    Wayne Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,130
    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I never used the inner envelope when sending film in, and I've never had a problem. I think that is more for keeping the film fresh than dark. Of course it doesnt hurt anything to use it, I'm just lazy and seek the path of least resistance. It has only bitten me once in 25 years, when I accidentally opened a box with about 50 exposed sheets. Even then, few of them were completely ruined.
     
  8. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

    Messages:
    6,714
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Ditto.

    Also, regarding tape. The kind folks at my former (RIP) lab asked that the boxes not be taped up excessively. I used masking tape (small strip on two sides) and rubber bands to hold my processing instructions. Never had a problem.

    If not previously mentioned, make sure the box is indelibly marked with your name, address/phone and instructions to return the box. I've only rarely had them not do that anyway, but I don't shoot enough film to make lots of boxes so I need to keep what I have.