Shielding Polaroids from light?

Discussion in 'Instant Cameras, Backs and Film' started by pbryld, Jun 6, 2011.

  1. pbryld

    pbryld Member

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    Why is this necessary? I have seen tips on how to do it with darkslides and Impossible boxes.

    On all the Polaroid cameras I have, there is a black slip/thingey hanging on to the picture when it gets pushed out, shielding it better than any of the tips I've seen.

    Why is that not enough? It apparently was when Polaroid existed...
     
  2. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    When SX-70 or 600 film comes out, there is no black thingy.

    The Impossible Project's film isn't as good as Polaroid's was... it's about as simple as that. Hopefully it'll improve over time, but who knows; it just goes to show you how amazing a product it was and how hard it is to recreate it.
     
  3. xya

    xya Member

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    one has to admit that a part of the chemicals in original polaroid film are not allowed any more. so the impossible project has to remake the film from scratch. yes, I also hope that they still can improve their product. so we're all waiting for a miracle to happen again.
     
  4. Joe VanCleave

    Joe VanCleave Member

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    As much as I'd like to use high-quality instant film in my mint brown leather SX-70 camera (I even have the original carrying case), I'm currently enjoying using a brand new Fuji Instax Wide 210 instant camera. The film is at least as good as SX-70 was from Polaroid, and there's no issues of developing in direct light. The prints, they have a thin, transparent film over the front that protects the image while it develops and also is part of how the chemicals from the pod get spread evenly across the image area. Whatever reason Polaroid gave for not being able to manufacture instant film any longer, Fuji is still doing it, and it's great-quality film. The Instax Wide film is sorta 16:9 wide aspect ratio, rather than square format.

    The camera, it's not as elegantly engineered as the SX-70 was, and it's a bit large and klunky looking, but it works great. And comes with an attachment on the lens for close-up focusing, with a sighting aid for parallax correcting the off-center optical viewfinder during close-ups.

    In the several dozen shots I've taken thus far, I've only had two shots come out that weren't good, one was when trying to capture sunlight from a window shining in my hallway and the center-weighted metering underexposed the shot (something I should have understood ahead of time and compensated for), the other was when I was trying to shield the lens from sunlight and got part of my hand in the picture (I redid the shot and the lens, it's flare-proof enough that it didn't need shielding). A great hit-ratio of good exposures and focus, compared to my past experience with Polaroid cameras.

    I found the best deal for the Instax Wide film was a set of five, two-pack boxes, that's 100 exposures for less than 80 cents per shot, on a major internet sales website that's also known for books and such.

    ~Joe

    PS: Edit to add link to Flickr Instax 200 Wide Group site.
     
  5. xya

    xya Member

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    you are absolutely right about the quality of the instax film. I own one myself (as well as an instax mini). but I would like a sx-70 style folding camera for it.

    reinhard