Shot ISO 160 film as ISO 400, should I trash it?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by haring, Feb 13, 2013.

  1. haring

    haring Member

    Messages:
    138
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2011
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Please don't laugh!

    I have shot two rolls of 35mm ISO 160 film last week. The camera was set to ISO 400, should I trash the two rolls? Is sending it to the lab a waste of money?

    Thanks!
     
  2. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    16,816
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Which film?

    What sort of light - flash, contrasty sun, high overcast, ... ??

    What sort of subject - portraits, product shots, landscapes, birthday parties?
     
  3. Klainmeister

    Klainmeister Member

    Messages:
    1,492
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2010
    Location:
    Santa Fe, NM
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    In my experience, unless it's slide film, it should be fine. 1-2 stop underexposure won't kill color negative film...in fact, might make it quite saturated depending on the film itself.
     
  4. bvy

    bvy Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,852
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Ha! Try harder. Maybe 3200. No, certainly don't trash it. You might have lost some shadows, but definitely worth processing.
     
  5. haring

    haring Member

    Messages:
    138
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2011
    Shooter:
    35mm
    You are right... Here you are:Fuji 400H, 35mm. No flash. I have used them during an engagement session. Shadow, no contrasty sun.
     
  6. haring

    haring Member

    Messages:
    138
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2011
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Thanks so much! I will send them to the lab.
     
  7. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,947
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, V
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    You mean Fuji Pro 160S?

    It may very well deliver better results than 400H @ 400 anyway :tongue:
     
  8. chamon88

    chamon88 Member

    Messages:
    10
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Location:
    Montreal
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Why you don't ask the lab to push them +1 stop , recently at our lab we devlop portra 160 push +2 1/2 stop with
    very good result contrast go up a bit.

    Thanks Chamon
     
  9. thegman

    thegman Member

    Messages:
    623
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Agree, a +1 stop push is nothing really, a good lab should be able to do this.
     
  10. Felinik

    Felinik Member

    Messages:
    428
    Joined:
    May 13, 2012
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I join the choir here, get them pushed +1 in development and you'll probably be happily surprised how good it looks!

    :smile:


    Some time ago I shot a cpl of rolls APX 100, thinking it was HP5+ 400, on EI 1600 (they came from an unmarked bulk loader and the previous owner told me it was HP5+ in it)..

    When I found out I had not yet developed the rolls and managed to actually at least get something on almost all frames, I'm not saying I'd recommend this, but I'm sure there's a bunch of people who'd call the pictures great modern art....

    :D
     
  11. j.c.denton

    j.c.denton Member

    Messages:
    52
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I've been shooting Potra 160 in 35mm at ISO 800 and let the lab do only +1 push development, meaning development at ISO 320. So underexposure was comparable. I took shots of a music events and some on an automotive exhibition. The negs came back a bit dark, but nothing that a good scanner could not handle.

    Your shots will probably be fine even if you do not compensate for it in development.

    Christian
     
  12. David Lyga

    David Lyga Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,872
    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Location:
    Philadelphia
    Shooter:
    35mm
    You underexposed by a full two stops. (I consider 160 film to REALLY be 100 film.) Thus you need to over develop by about 25% - 33%, or a bit more. You will attain decent highlights but shadow detail will be pitiful. But, honestly, you should have little problems with color-crossover and might be surprised with how great your highlights look. Midtones will be OK but not ideal. - David Lyga
     
  13. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    16,816
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    A push development will increase the contrast, but won't make any meaningful difference with respect to shadow detail.

    If the nature of the light and the subject are such that an increase in contrast might help, then go ahead and order a one stop "push".

    If, however, your shots include a lot of highlight flesh tones and human features, you may prefer to leave the contrast unchanged, knowing that the "near shadows" will lack contrast.