shutter speeds

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by robin623, Sep 29, 2012.

  1. robin623

    robin623 Member

    Messages:
    4
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2012
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    What are the advantages of owning a DSLR with a shutter speed of 1/8000 sec as opposed to a speed of 1/4000 sec ?
    I see many top end DSLR's have a speed of 1/4000 sec , how often would you find the need of 1/8000 sec for creative situations and or in general shooting situations ?

    [​IMG]Thanks for your thoughts.
     
  2. chriscrawfordphoto

    chriscrawfordphoto Member

    Messages:
    1,191
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2007
    Location:
    Fort Wayne,
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    The 1/8000 shutter speed was actually first introduced on 35mm film SLRs back in the 1980s. I believe the Nikon N8008 was the first. My old Nikon F4s film camera has 1/8000 top shutter speed, as does my digital Canon 5DmkII. As to its usefulness, I have used it exactly once, with the F4s, when I was in high school in 1994, when photographing a sports event for the school newspaper. It would be most useful for sports and wildlife work, and even there it would be used rarely.
     
  3. Pioneer

    Pioneer Member

    Messages:
    1,755
    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Location:
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    1/8000 seconds

    I have this shutter speed available on my Pentax PZ-1p 35mm camera and I have personally found it useful when I am shooting ultrafast films (think Fuji Superia 1600 or Kodak TMax P3200 (or Delta Pro 3200.) I also have it on my Canon 5D digital, but I rarely have use for it since that camera's ISO can easily be adjusted for each individual shot (as opposed to having to work with a whole roll of film.) However, like any available shutter speed, I am sure it is useful in certain artistic circumstances where you may need to try and stop some particularly fast action.
     
  4. 250swb

    250swb Member

    Messages:
    396
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2012
    Location:
    Peak Distric
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    1/8000th second is particularly useful if you have fast lenses that you want to use wide open in daylight.

    Steve
     
  5. BMbikerider

    BMbikerider Member

    Messages:
    864
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2012
    Location:
    County Durha
    Shooter:
    35mm
    When you think of it there are quite a lot of things on a camera that are rarely used - for instance I have never used 'program mode' or Shutter priority. But for some they are useful and for the manufacturer they are a selling point. Minolta even had a 1/12000th on the Dynax 9 how many times was that used?
     
  6. Ricardo Miranda

    Ricardo Miranda Member

    Messages:
    2,164
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2012
    Location:
    London, UK
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I'm sorry to ask this: Robin, are you sure you are in the right forum? This one is for Large Format cameras and for Film cameras!
    Thanks!
     
  7. SuzanneR

    SuzanneR Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    5,894
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2004
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've moved this to the 35mm forum, and since there are film cameras with a 1/8000 shutter speed we can keep the discussion open, but discussing DSLR's is off topic for APUG. Try our sister site DPUG if you want to discuss DSLR cameras and their features.
     
  8. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,688
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It's an expensive neutral density filter in other words :smile:
     
  9. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

    Messages:
    2,393
    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Location:
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I think this question you should ask yourself. For example myself I have never used shutter speed above 1/1000 for almost 40 years I have used the camera so to me a camera with high shutter speed is no advantage.


    There is one thing though and I don't know if it's true. Many of my old 35mm SLR the top shutter speed of 1/1000 are not accurate so if my Nikon F5 with top shutter speed of 1/8000 and that may not be accurate but is the 1/1000 speed is any more accurate???
     
  10. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    20,235
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    i always use ultra high shutter speeds when i take portraits
    especially when i am photographing someone really "twitchy"
    the last thing i want is to get a blurry image
    when i am shooting wide open, and if i can catch a bug in flight
    its icing on the cake !
     
  11. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

    Messages:
    3,921
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2011
    Location:
    Adirondacks
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You would have to check each camera. My new 35mm SLR was made in 1970 or so, and 1/1000 of a second really is 1/1000 of a second, after cleaning and lubricating and adjusting the shutter. :smile:
     
  12. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

    Messages:
    2,393
    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Location:
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Thanks! I haven't figure out how to get my Nikon F5 to fire its shutter with the back open or removed yet so I can't test its shutter speed yet.
     
  13. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

    Messages:
    3,921
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2011
    Location:
    Adirondacks
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It gets challenging to measure those speeds, the slit becomes quite narrow.
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,045
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I never a camera that had 1/8000 shutter speed. Can film go into a reverse reciprocity failure?
     
  16. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

    Messages:
    3,921
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2011
    Location:
    Adirondacks
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    There is short exposure reciprocity failure, yes.
     
  17. Ricardo Miranda

    Ricardo Miranda Member

    Messages:
    2,164
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2012
    Location:
    London, UK
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Ben,
    You can buy these days a Nikon F-801 or even a F90 for under £40. They have 1/8000th shutters. I'm almost sure the F-801 was the first to have such a high speed shutter.
     
  18. fstop

    fstop Member

    Messages:
    788
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Shooter:
    35mm
    In motorsports photography we are always looking for speed.

    You wouldn't move your camera a couple inches during exposure. but an object moving at only 140 mph moves over 2 inches in 1/1000 of a second.
    motion=blur
     
  19. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

    Messages:
    2,265
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2007
    Location:
    Metro DC are
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The first Canon 1D digi has a 1/16,000 speed
    I'm unsure if the shutter actually moves that fast or if the sensor cycles on/off in the correct increment.

    Opps did I just say that.
     
  20. Pumalite

    Pumalite Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,078
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2009
    Location:
    Here & Now
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    +1
     
  21. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

    Messages:
    1,926
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've used it on my F6 for a bunch of times when I was pushing Tri-X to 1600 and 3200. That way I could shoot in low light easially, but bump up the shutter and still shoot shallow in good light.
     
  22. polyglot

    polyglot Member

    Messages:
    3,470
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Location:
    South Austra
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I can confirm that 1/8000 is great for motorsports up real close though it does mean using a fast film (sensor) and lens combo (f/2.8 ISO1600 1/6400 in the shade). Minolta even did a couple of 1/12000 models, e.g. the 9.

    I do prefer the panned slow-shutter approach (sharp vehicle, blurred background), though it has a much lower hit-rate and doesn't work with a rotating (pitching or rolling) vehicle and fails if they go over a bump at the wrong time.
     
  23. Wade D

    Wade D Member

    Messages:
    901
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Location:
    Jamul, CA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I use 1/8000 only for the occasional air show with the Minolta 8000i. A Thunderbird or Blue Angel passing show center at 500mph needs it.
    Before getting that camera 1/1000 and panning was the only option with mixed results.
     
  24. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,688
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    My Canon T90s go to 1/4000 sec, but since I shoot mainly portraits I rarely use any faster than 1/500 sec. except on very bright days.
     
  25. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,809
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    I find spark photography more useful than high shutter speeds.
     
  26. erikg

    erikg Member

    Messages:
    1,455
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2003
    Location:
    pawtucket rh
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It's free if you already own the camera. :wink: