small-tank processing device for automated tilting and chemistries exchange

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by AgX, Jun 2, 2013.

  1. AgX

    AgX Member

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  2. gleaf

    gleaf Subscriber

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    Quite interesting. Servo seems to have enough snap to achieve pumping of the fluid across the film surface on each rock. as long as there is sufficient change of chemistry at the emulsion surface and it is even for the full length... its a wonder. Very cool.
     
  3. MSchuler

    MSchuler Subscriber

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    I think that the Japanese have a word for this:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chindogu

    The device is very creative and obviously took a lot of work to create. However, doing small tank development by hand seems much more efficient for a number of reasons.
     
  4. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 2, 2013
  5. AgX

    AgX Member

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    To me the most surprising feature of that DIY device is the low agitation.
     
  6. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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    Interesting devices. Personally though I prefer to be more involved in the process. After all, that's why I'm still into film. :wink:
     
  7. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

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    AGX, if you are doing hand inversion, or agitation, then many people will only agitate for 10 seconds +- every minute and that has been successful for about a century, give or take.

    If you have been using a Jobo rotary processor as I have, then it does look a little low on the agitation, but whenever I hand develop, I do it at one minute intervals, doesn't seem to make much difference if you adjust your developing times accordingly.

    Thanks for the link, very good.

    Mick.
     
  8. AgX

    AgX Member

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    I did not think of the agitation sequence but the agitation amplitude: that tilting of the tank against the inversion of the tank
     
  9. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

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    Aah, point taken, yes I did look closely at that, but concluded it would work.

    I thought about rotary processing, whereby the film is out of the developer for about 45% of the time.

    Mick.
     
  10. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

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    "Amplitude", word of the day, nice choice of word there.

    Mick.
     
  11. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    Interesting machine. I'd be worried about that method of agitation though. The builder really needs to analyze the resulting negatives for development uniformity.

    In his meticulous testing, Richard Henry constructed an automatic agitation machine, although it was only for agitation and did not automatically pump chemistry in/out. In testing for uniformity and agitation patterns with inversion agitation, he found that not only were complete inversions required, but that when inversions are machine controlled some rotation about the tank axis was required in order to "randomize" the agitation.
     
  12. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    This was exactly the question I had when seeing the machine's agitation. Because the motion is always the same will there be the possibility of something like like "surge marks?" With people the motion will always be different.

    Then there is the problem of the tank not being fully inverted. If you look at a diagram of Kodak's recommended method, not only is the tank inverted but it is also given a swirl each time.

    One other point. Since highly conductive solutions will be used has the unit been tested for electrical safety?
     
  13. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Gerald, it's only a DIY apparatus, thus on the builder's own risk. It is not for sale, nor did the bilder released plans.
    It was nevertheless introduced at a german forum to serve as kind of incentive for own DIY Versions.
    Sorry for being not clear enough on this matter.

    It should run on low-voltage and thus an, external solid-state and thus most probabably tight, in-line transformer could be used.
    The builder employed 12V and 5V and used a PC-power supply, though I don't know where he placed it.


    I would place the electronics above chemistries level in a tight box.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 7, 2013
  14. Rudeofus

    Rudeofus Subscriber

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    If I were to build a device for tanks that can hold 120 film (and I have given this some consideration), I'd make sure it would be roller type, not inversion/tilt type. It has always struck me that one has to prepare 500ml for a single roll of film, and with a roller tank system one could reduce this to 250ml or less. And I would likely do without the pump system, cleaning out the tubing would likely require more effort than pouring the liquids by hand, at least for low volume processing.