Smallest tripod for Hasselblad?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by arigram, Apr 22, 2005.

  1. arigram

    arigram Member

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    I use a Manfrotto 055Pro tripod with my Hasselblad 501CM and at present 80 Planar lens which I love but I find it too large and heavy for certain duties, like an over-seas travelling companion. I have been thinking of getting a second tripod but I am not sure which would be the smallest that will support my camera and either 50mm or 80mm lenses.
    Will the tiny Manfrotto Digi 714SHB tripod that supports up to 2.5 kilos, folds to 35cm and weights justs a kilo be enough or maybe go for the carbon 4 section 190MF4 which supports 4kilos, folds to 46cm and weights 1.6 kilos?
    I know the theory of using the heaviest tripod you can afford and that an unsteady tripod is worst than no tripods, what's your opinion?
     
  2. Nicole

    Nicole Member

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    Hi Arigram, sorry I can't help you there. I have a Gitzo tripod which is not light but take it with me anyway. Good excercise! It also doubles as self-defense. LOL. I do have a 'cheapy' light tripod which I never touch anymore, even if I'd love the convenience. It's just not worth it. When you're climbing that mountain with your 501c/m and Manfrotto, spare a thought for the LF shooters! :D As I said, I'm of no help here. Cheers, Nicole
     
  3. David Henderson

    David Henderson Member

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    I use a Manfrotto 190 pro with a 488 ballhead for my Bronicas in cities and other environments where I don't expect much wind or rough terrain. It works just fine and I have lenses to 250mm. But if I'm going to be in rough country I have a 055 that I'll use instead, and in strong wind with a long lens that's not enough either.
     
  4. Phillip P. Dimor

    Phillip P. Dimor Member

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    While not specific to Hasselblad, I've used the worlds cheapest plastic tripod available from WalMart and anywhere else for around $20 with a bit of patience..

    With my Pentax 645, long cable release and a string or strap tied/hooked to the bottom of the center column and pulled taught with my foot I can stabilize the camera quite well. Probably wouldn't work so well for long lenses, heavier cameras, etc.
    I'm almost sure a P67 or an RB would visibly shake the tripod as it's mirror comes slapping back.

    My real tripod is a Husky Quik-set 15lb. monster, meant for cine cameras.
    The cheapy tripod is what I take when I'm going to be on my feet for 12 to 15 hours..
     
  5. Ara Ghajanian

    Ara Ghajanian Member

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    Nicole,
    Don't laugh. My personal hero, Bob Crane (says a lot about my character), was murdered in his sleep with a tripod to the head.

    Arigram,
    Back to the subject at hand: I used to own a Mamiya RB67, which is a pretty heavy camera and I'd use a small Bogen 3011 (don't quote me on the model number) that is intended for 35mm. I used that combination for years and never really had a problem. Of course, I never used it in windy situations. I wouldn't recommend it for long exposures, though.
    Ara
     
  6. david b

    david b Member

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    I use a bogen/Manfrotto Carbon Fiber 3443 tripod with a Kirk BH-3 head.

    Perfect!!
     
  7. bobfowler

    bobfowler Subscriber

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    Not a Hassy user, but I shoot with Bronica's...

    My first choice would be a Bogen/Manfrotto 3021 with a good ball head. I've used tripods as light as the 3001, but I wouldn't make a habit of it.
     
  8. harveyje

    harveyje Subscriber

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    I also use the 3011 with a ball head for 35, 6x6, and 4x5 - Its not the best but seems to work fairly well, except when using my Wista in the wind.
     
  9. waynecrider

    waynecrider Member

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    For my light tripod I use a Slik Sprint Pro with a Giotto 1001 and RRS plate with my 501cm and 60mm. It seems to work good, but I do have a habit of using mirror lockup, and do on occasion may hold the ballhead down a little. It is easy to open and can be used like a monopod with the legs together. The legs are adjustable to different angles and have rubber feet or spikes when the feet are screwed in. I have a habit of leaving my Hassy on the ballhead and carrying it by the ballhead with 1 or 2 sections of legs closed depending on where I am. This is a nice light tripod to carry and I doubt I would change it for anything, even a carbon fiber as they would be much bulkier to carry. Price is right at about $89. On a recent 6 mile hike it was a real pleasure to carry compared to my larger Manfrotto.
     
  10. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    The venerable Tiltall does well. Try to find an older Leitz or Marchioni version.

    For something current, I've been thinking of trying one of the new Giottos universal tripods. You can rotate the column 90-degrees and use it as a copy stand, like a Benbo, and it can function in a limited way without a head. There is a carbon fiber and an aluminum version, each in a three-section and a two-section.
     
  11. George Papantoniou

    George Papantoniou Member

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    Ari, when you don't want to carry a heavy tripod (and you don't have the money to buy a carbon fiber one) you can always get a wooden one. Berlebach is the one you'll find in Athens (if you ever travel this far) and I know that Hippocrates Farasopoulos still has one or two in stock. Bargain the price (tell him you're my friend, it'll help) and get one while they're still there.

    I got a tripod and a monopod for the price of one.

    Still, if you decide to sell a kidney and get some extra cash then you'll be able to buy the Manfrotto carbon fiber...
     
  12. arigram

    arigram Member

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    Thank you guys!
    And especially thank you Mr. Papantoniou. I will really consider your suggestion when I am in Athens next time.
     
  13. blansky

    blansky Subscriber

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    Something you might consider is that when using a lighter tripod that you trip the mirror before making the exposure so that the exposure is only the leaf shutter. This will virtually eliminate any vibration you get.

    The reason we get beafy tripods is to control vibration so the first thing I'd do is hang my camera bag on the tripod to add weight and the second thing is trip the mirror first.


    Michael
     
  14. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    I think minimising vibration is more of a concern with the LF
    group and their use of large cross section to mass
    cameras; air currents. Wait till the wind wanes.

    Where ground source vibration is present, grounding the tripod
    with it's mass or added mass I'd think counter productive.
    Wait till the vibs subside.

    I'm not bothered by ground or wind sources of vibration.
    The wooded, cliffed, gorged, landscape in which I work is free
    of those. Balance though has on occasion been a concern when
    working the rough, sloping, loose terrain. That is where a 6 x 6 or
    rotating back RB or RZ are the best choice in medium format. I've
    one of each but yet to use them on location. My Bronica 6 x 4.5
    will be in use to start the season. I'll be being careful when
    flipping it on yielding terrain. Dan