Smooth black paint to for film transport plate

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by keithwms, Dec 20, 2009.

  1. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    The black paint is flaking off the metal plates over which the film passes in my new-to-me Mamiya Six folder. I fear that the film might be scratched. The flaking is right on the area where the film passes over. I don't see evidence of scratching in my test roll... but the paint is coming off quite steadily.

    Suggestions for what to paint on there? Whatever was on there looks to be a thin black enamel. I was thinking about black nail polish... anybody got better ideas?
     
  2. Nige

    Nige Subscriber

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    black enamel... :smile:
     
  3. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    The plate is powder coated. See if you can't find another plate from a dead camera or the local camera repair shop.
     
  4. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    The camera's from the late 50's isn't it?
    If it's black trim it's either enamel or lacquer. If it's the pressure plate it could be anodized or possibly painted.
    If you paint it use a spray & several very light coats.
     
  5. Richard Wasserman

    Richard Wasserman Member

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    And be sure you get it very clean and all the loose paint removed. 600 grit paper down to the bare metal and then a coat of primer would be good so the new paint will adhere and not flake off again.
     
  6. Joe Grodis

    Joe Grodis Member

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    If you need to paint it and simply can't find a replacement plate I'd try "grill" paint. Grill paint is a high temp very durable paint used on Barbecue grills that has a finish similar to gun "blue." The reason I'd use this is because it's thin and wouldn't be so thick like normal paint to alter the clearance for the film. I used to rebuild / restore military type firearms and grill paint is a little known secret for and amazing finish that looks anodized yet it's just a spray can.
     
  7. unclemack

    unclemack Member

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    Hi, good advice already given. Sand perfectly smooth with 600-grit, feather the edges of chips, thinnest coats you can manage, gloss not matt if the film will touch it. One more thing. Many paints use solvents which could damage film/emulsion. (oh yes - and your lungs...)

    So do the job away from where you keep your film, your children, your pets... and leave the camera open for at least a week before putting film in it to let solvents evaporate. The surface of the paint will feel dry in minutes but don't be tempted! It won't be fully cured for ages yet.

    Haven't used grill paint myself but one Amazon reviewer claims to have painted a wood-burner a year ago and still smelling paint...

    Good luck & happy holidays.