Smooth Cyanotype paper

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by kevin klein, Feb 23, 2014.

  1. kevin klein

    kevin klein Member

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    What can be used for smooth surface cyanotypes other than hot pressed watercolor paper, and cheap.
     
  2. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser

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    hi kevin

    im not sure how archival it is
    but i use what someone at RISD told me was "butcher paper"
    its cheap ( i got a 32x40 x 200 sheet stack FREE ) and smooth and thin
    also i use borden & reily velum it works great
    and is not expensive at all. the chemicals like it too ...
    ( so do liquid emulsions ! )

    - john
     
  3. adelorenzo

    adelorenzo Subscriber

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    I have a pad of Yupo paper that I've been meaning to try. It's a smooth, waterproof watercolor paper. Because it's waterproof I'm not sure if it will actually hold the emulsion or not, it might just rinse away.
     
  4. Loris Medici

    Loris Medici Member

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    adelorenzo, Yupo won't work w/o a primer, it's absolutely impermeable and with cyanotype you need the emulsion IN the paper.

    kevin, try Masa paper it's perfect for all iron / iron-silver processes and it's cheap too. (Something like USD 1.2 - 1.3 per 21x31" sheet... I remember the times when it was only USD 0.7/sheet.)
     
  5. nsurit

    nsurit Subscriber

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    I'm currently printing a series on Canson Editions which has one smooth surface. It is cheap. First run I had a little trouble with coating, however subsequent ones with my paying a little more attention I have had no problem, I do use a little Tween with it. Bill Barber
     
  6. hermit

    hermit Member

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    Kevin, I do a lot of my wet and dry plate 5 x 7's as cyanotypes to get a good look at the neg before settling on what process I will print them in, and then finish off some as cyanotypes. Years ago after much searching I started using Strathmore Sketch 300 50 pound paper. Just bought a new 18 x 24, 30 sheet pad for $12.75 at a local art store. It takes and holds good the old traditional cyanotype chemicals, does not rip easy , and is great tea tonned. Takes the extra wash after being tonned too. You can see some examples in my gallery. Best I've found and done hundreds on it!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 24, 2014
  7. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Loris, am I miss reading what you say here, as with Cyanotype you don't need an emulsion (by that I mean gelatin).
     
  8. kevin klein

    kevin klein Member

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    Thanks everyone, I will do some experimenting.
     
  9. Loris Medici

    Loris Medici Member

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    Clive you're right, "sensitizer" would be the absolutely correct term here. But we often intermix these two terms here in the alt-process forum, trivial stuff... BTW you don't absolutely need gelatin for an "emulsion".
     
  10. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

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    Yes, I understand any suspension substance may be classed as such.
     
  11. kevin klein

    kevin klein Member

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    Loris, do you coat the smoothest side or the slightly rough side?
     
  12. mcilroy

    mcilroy Member

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    I use "Bristol" papers, when I want smooth. Bristol paper comes in various weights and brands, just make sure not to use the very heavy variants, as they basically are multiple layers glued together (like passepartouts), which get separated in long water baths.

    The brand my art shop sells makes single layered Bristol paper up to 495g/m².

    However, it's usually buffered, so an acid treatment is recommended to get the best possible Dmax.
     
  13. Loris Medici

    Loris Medici Member

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    kevin, both sides are usable, I personally prefer the smooth side.