Solargraph with a Brownie 2A?

Discussion in 'Lo-Fi Cameras' started by Arctic amateur, Oct 16, 2013.

  1. Arctic amateur

    Arctic amateur Member

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    I'm thinking about putting up some solargraph cameras. Could I use my Kodak Brownie 2A instead of making a shoebox pinhole camera? Then I already have a light-tight box (with some tinfoil over the red window). Or could I risk gathering so much light that I would set fire to the photo paper (and camera, and house) instead of getting a picture?
     
  2. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member

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    I'm sure that you'd burn the paper.
    And, for solargraphs, you need a very long exposure, an aperture larger than a pinhole would not allow this without over-exposure.
     
  3. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    I'm pretty sure you won't start a fire---I've done multi-hour exposures of this type with conventional cameras, on hot sunny days, without a problem. That said, it might be prudent to start at a time when you can be around for the first day, so that if anything *does* go awry you're there to react to it.

    -NT
     
  4. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser

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    i'd be careful
    i know of someone who burned his
    speed graphic with the shutter on B
    and the camera on the roof of his car ...

    if you use a lens'ed camera
    it doesn't take a long time to get a retina image ...
    ( a photograph of "something" on the paper long exposure )
    so i can't imagine how you would do this pointing at the sun
    unless you make your own pinhole aperture and put it infront
    of the lens to created a pinhole'd lens'd image ...
     
  5. Arctic amateur

    Arctic amateur Member

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    I didn't think you could "overexpose" a solargraph, seeing as they're done with anything form one day to six months' overexposure. I'll try a day-long exposure a day I'm at home and see how it works.

    jnanian: A pinhole in front of the lens would just obscure the field of view.
     
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  6. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser

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    solargraphs are usually done with a pinhole camera, not usually a camera with a lens ...
    although i have heard of someone making solargraphs with old POP paper and an 8x10 camera with a lens ..

    i'm not sure how a pinhole infront of a lens would it obscure the field of view at all ...

    it seems like it would be like making your own "waterhouse stops" ... and a brownie 2a
    uses a meniscus lens, and its aperture/s are infront of the lens cell ...
    otherwise your exposures with regular developing out paper will be very short .... ( as compared to months )

    have fun with your tests
     
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  7. bvy

    bvy Subscriber

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    I've made solargraphs with a homemade lens camera -- a fresnel lens fitted into a cigar box. The box is four inches deep, and the lens is fixed at roughly f/8. I used Ilford MG paper. But these were (relatively) short exposures, usually made in the course of an afternoon. The results, I thought, were worthwhile. I can post something later if there's interest.
     
  8. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    Wow! Another reason to prefer the metal Graphics. :smile:

    I dunno---under your influence, I did once take an afternoon's exposure to make a sunprint that turned out to have the track of the sun in the image. It didn't really cause much bleed outside its track, so I wouldn't be surprised to find that a multi-day version would have several parallel tracks like we're used to seeing in pinhole solargraphs.

    I don't remember what aperture I used, but I think the lens in question only goes down to f/32, so it certainly wasn't pinholesque.

    Disclaimer: I am not advocating anything, all performers are trained professionals or pretending to be, don't try this or anything else at home, and please don't set your camera, car, spouse, or hair on fire.

    -NT
     
  9. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser

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    if there was some sun out today, i would gladly set up a brownie 1a and something else up
    and see what happens .. its too crummy out gloomy and looks like rain :sad:

    sounds like fun nathan!
    under my influence hehe, hope you didn't get arrested afterwards
    or your hair on end, like you you had your hand in a plug or on a van der graph generator !

    i think it was domenico foschi who burned up his speeder ... i tried to find the thread where he described he tale of woe :sad:
    ( but came up empty )

    john
     
  10. NedL

    NedL Subscriber

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    A few weeks ago I left out a big cardboard box camera with a piece of color photo paper in it.... I was trying to make a "retina print". It was out for around 8 or 9 hours and I didn't mean to but I got a sun streak on the paper. I agree with NT, over the course of a week or so you could probably get multiple sun trails.... the paper I was using is slow slow slow... it took three days to reach max dark grey sitting on my desk!

    But I would worry very much about starting a fire and it might not be good enough to see that a fire doesn't start in a day or two... like leaving a magnifying glass in your window aimed at a piece of paper and hoping that it doesn't catch your house on fire... you might not want to feel safe just because a fire didn't start in the first day or two!

    I agree with John that a pinhole over the lens is a good idea and it will not affect your coverage. The result will be like a "sharper pinhole" and you won't have to worry about burning down your house!

    Have fun!