Some ISO 100 film questions

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by msbarnes, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. msbarnes

    msbarnes Member

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    I usually shoot tri-x for my Rollei 35. I normally guess exposure and it works fine but I normally shoot stopped down and use it for landscape. I just want something finder grain and just as easy to use.

    The films that I am thinking of are:
    Acros 100: Love it in 120, never tried it in 35mm
    TMAX 100 or 400: I do not have much experience with this film, 400 I found OK in 120...very fine grain but most films are with large negatives
    Delta 100 or 400: No experience with this film.
    Pan F 50: No experience with this film.


    Well i now that Pan F offers a very different look: high contrast and traditional grain but maybe* not any finer than the others.

    My questions are on the usability:
    1. Latitude: How do these films rank in terms of lattitude. I am just guessing exposure but err on overexposure and it works fine. My thinking is that Pan F is not the best in this department and that faster films are less leniant than faster films.
    2. Latent image: How do these films rank in this department. I would finish a roll maybe once every 1-3 weeks. It is my everyday carry and I simply do not shoot enough on a daily basis and when I do I oftentimes like to take my bigger cameras.
     
  2. David Brown

    David Brown Subscriber

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    Try one or two rolls of each. Seriously. In the final analysis, you are going to have to like the look of the film and that is subjective.

    Also, the developer you use will make differences in all the films you listed.

    As to your objective criteria: latency for 1-3 weeks is not an issue. Good grief, amateurs leave a roll of film in their camera from one Christmas to the next. On latitude, you are going to have to test that, too, ultimately, for the way you shoot AND process. No doubt someone on here will come up with hard numbers that mean something in some context, but the bottom line is that picking a film is subjective. Take some pictures and take your pick. :smile:
     
  3. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    You'll get lots of opinions and views so best to try them for yourself. That's a lot of films to try though, and you can't shoot one or two rolls and come to meaningful conclusions. Here are some quick characteristics which may (or may not) help. Don't worry about latent image stability.

    TMax100
    -Finest grain
    -Short toe with long scale and gradual shouldering

    Acros
    -Almost as fine grained as TMax 100
    -Short toe, long scale, very high highlight contrast with relatively abrupt shoulder at very high density
    -Virtually no reciprocity failure up to ~2 minutes exposure

    Delta 100
    -Somewhat more grainy than TMax 100/Delta, but still very fine grained (about the same as Pan F+)
    -Slightly longer toe than TMax 100, long scale, gradual shoulder, slightly higher contrast than TMax 100 in extreme highlights

    TMax 400
    -Exceedingly fine grain for a 400 speed film
    -Short toe with very long scale

    These films all work very well in D-76/ID-11 and a variety of other developers such as XTOL and Ilford DDX. One thing people might say is that these films are harder to work with and more sensitive to development variations than Tri-X. I have found them to be only slightly more sensitive. They are not hard to work with at all, and offer lots of flexibility.
     
  4. msbarnes

    msbarnes Member

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    thanks.

    Just to clarify, i wasn't asking advice on which particular film I should pursue and which film is superior. I understand that they offer different looks but I just wanted to know a bit more on the objective side of things to help make informed decisions. I didn't want to ask about which grain is finer or how the looks differ because the responses will likely be all over the place. I figured that usability might be more consistent in views (or maybe not).

    I think I will be fine with either, and I use D-76 most often.
     
  5. kevs

    kevs Member

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    Ilford FP4 + is rated 125 ASA and has plenty of latitude so is very flexible, has good latent image stability and fairly fine grain. I can't compare the grain to the others. There's also Agfapan APX100 still available from Silverprint etc. You can probably get it in the US if that's where you're based. Both work well in ID-11 / D-76.
     
  6. destroya

    destroya Subscriber

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    take a look at the ultrafine extreme 100. i read that people think its kentmere. bought a 100 foot roll to try out as it was cheap. i was really impressed with how sharp it was and how little grain there was. for the price, under $30 for a 100 feet its worth a look.