Something a little different... ULF still life

Discussion in 'Ultra Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by scootermm, May 5, 2008.

  1. scootermm

    scootermm Subscriber

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    Well, its at least a little different for me. Actually, VERY different for me. Not something I thought I would ever really be interested in, but surprisingly I've really been enjoying it.

    I posted one of these a few weeks back and received some nice comments.
    So thought I would share the first 10 or so that I've done.

    Would love to hear peoples thoughts and comments.

    Window Sill Series

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2008
  2. Jim Fitzgerald

    Jim Fitzgerald Member

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    I think it is fantastic. This has given me some new ideas for both the 11x14 and the 8x20. Thanks for posting this.

    Jim
     
  3. gandolfi

    gandolfi Member

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    it looks fantastic.

    what lens are you using - love the softness!

    just got my 12x16 camera ready to use - gonna try homemade glass negatives, as real negatives are out of my reach.................................

    I love stills, so this is a great inspiration.
     
  4. scootermm

    scootermm Subscriber

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    Gandolfi, Jim, Thank you for the kind words.

    The lens is a 16inch Kodak Soft Focus Portrait "Dinner Plate" (er... I mean "lens") F4.5. Its beastly large and require a tripod to support the front standard when mounted. Takes up almost the entirety of the 6" x 6" F&S 12x20 lensboard.

    All the images were shot in the F6.3 - F8 range, using a lenscap and my internally calibrated chronometer - 1 one thousand, 2 one thousand
    :smile:
     
  5. argus

    argus Member

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    Aha, I see you like skulls too. I only have a deer skull that gets used rather often.

    Some images look a bit too crowded for me but I bet others will just like those. As long as you're happy with your creations, I am too.

    G
     
  6. nze

    nze Member

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    Great series. Still Life is a real pleasure to do with large format camera.I have 2 old 16" french lens I love to use on a 16X20 to make new still life.
     
  7. Tri Tran

    Tri Tran Subscriber

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    Matt, is works really nice.Thanks for sharing.
     
  8. scootermm

    scootermm Subscriber

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    Tri, Chris, G.
    Thank you for the comments. This is something quite different for me to even be trying, but I'm enjoying the challenge and how "different" it feels to see on a smaller scale, etc.

    thanks again.
     
  9. jimgalli

    jimgalli Subscriber

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    Matt, these are terrific. I enjoyed going through them. Thanks for sharing!
     
  10. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

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    Thanks for sharing this very nice series. I especially like the last one.
    Gives me a lot of ideas as it is certainly less physically challenging to do still lifes than working in the field with these wonderful beasts. At 79 even my somewhat lightweight 717 gets pretty heavy after a short while.
    Think I will load up some film and see what I can do.

    Jim
     
  11. Kimberly Anderson

    Kimberly Anderson Member

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    #3 is my favorite. Less is more for me. The two objects have a relationship. More than two or three and the message gets too confusing.

    12x20 still lives...who'd a thunk? Very nice printing by the way too.
     
  12. scootermm

    scootermm Subscriber

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    Thanks Michael.

    Much appreciated.
     
  13. Chris Breitenstein

    Chris Breitenstein Member

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    interesting! its not often that we here on APUG get to serial work like this presented in that manner. is this work based on a concept, or some other idea you are trying to communicate. The conceptualist in me wants this work to comment on family portraiture or repetitive habitual activity. The same elements being grouped together in the same location time after time caries some interesting implications.

    Yours:
     
  14. scootermm

    scootermm Subscriber

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    Chris, thank you for the interest in it.
    yes it actually does have some ideas/concepts behind it. Alot of it revolving around emotions one experiences in life, the certainty of death and life, beauty in varying forms (juxtaposition of two, etc etc)

    at the risk of sharing too much... I wrote this up for a friend of mine when asked "about" the series....


    Diversity is the spice of life, or so the saying goes.
    I never saw myself ever being a still life photographer, I still don’t. It has never held much interest for me, there is so much out in the world for me to find and explore that remaining indoors of confined to a tiny area of visual real estate just didn’t seem all that compelling.
    Then I started collecting skulls, weird ones, strange African horned animals – Bongos, Kudus, and Oryxes, all sorts of animal skulls. Knowing full well that I wanted to eventually photograph them and undoubtedly these images would fall into the realm of still life photography.
    Death is an intriguing experience. Death has a strong hold on human emotion. As a species, we know it is inevitable, yet we fear it immensely. When death strikes us personally we will often avoid facing it, for it creates situations of tension, despair, and loneliness. People I have cared for in life have died, I will eternally miss them, yet I also see beauty in their passage to death. I have grown because of their deaths, opening up to intense self discovery and realization. I have learned about the complexity and beauty that lies within me and can be manifested through me.
    There is considerable beauty to be found in death.
    It’s obvious the beauty that is inherently found in flowers. They are all around us, on the side of the highway, on a dining room table, hanging from a porch, or resting on a gravesite. They contain an obvious statement of beauty.
    These images are emotionally intense to create. I don’t partake in hunting and would likely never have bought a skull in my life were it not for my photographic passion. Nor would I have likely ever photographed flowers if it weren’t for my collection of skulls.
    They are a visual juxtaposition. Each containing a beauty unique to each part, yet create a beauty far grander when joined together.


    {end overly descriptive artspeak now. }
     
  15. SuzanneR

    SuzanneR Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Matt.. these are lovely. I think you are on to something here, and look forward to seeing where you take it... well done!
     
  16. Steve Sherman

    Steve Sherman Subscriber

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    Really nice series Matt.

    As I went through the series knowing the above comment on the last one I got to number twelve and thought this is the one for me and then I saw the warmth in the last one.

    Really exquisite image.
     
  17. David Brown

    David Brown Subscriber

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    :smile:

    Matthew:

    From knowing you as I do, I think one of the reasons you have more difficulty expressing yourself in words (than visually) is that you are a visual person. For you, 1 picture truly is worth 1000 words!

    I could be wrong, of course ...

    I see the next stage for you to be taking these skulls out into your "natural" environment, and including them in your landscapes and architectural work. Maybe some of your derilict buildings need skulls in them!

    (I could be wrong, of course ... )
     
  18. scootermm

    scootermm Subscriber

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    likely a fair amount of truth to all that David.
    But then again, I do enjoy the exercise of attempting to put it into words. :smile:
     
  19. makan

    makan Member

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    Seems to me like one idea, too many pictures. After a moment one knows that the next will be - skulls, of course, just a different setting. Beating the dead horse to his death?