Source for Heavy Duty Print Shipping Case...

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by PKM-25, Jan 6, 2014.

  1. PKM-25

    PKM-25 Member

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    Hi, I am basically looking for the equivalent of a 2" thick Pelican Case that would handle up to 20x24 unmounted prints to send to my spotter. I have an email in to Pelican to see if they make custom cases as my shipper says they do. I have looked at making a crate but don't like the lack of weather sealing that the P-case would inherently have.

    Any suggestions? I just don't see much out there at the moment....
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 6, 2014
  2. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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  3. PKM-25

    PKM-25 Member

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    I have a friend who has the 16x20x3 version in his gallery, it is just not up to snuff for going across the country several times a year.
     
  4. mgb74

    mgb74 Subscriber

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    I have one that is similar in style to the P50. I also consider it plenty "bomb proof" enough for mailing. And I think they are used for that all the time. If I was concerned about weatherproofing, a high quality trash can liner would ease my concern.

    If rolling is an option, you can build a tube from plastic plumbing pipe (use the version that is lighter - I forget what it's called).

    You could always visit your local art gallery and see what they use.
     
  5. AgX

    AgX Member

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    I guess making, or having made, a flat crate from triplex with foam rubber sealings would be the cheapest way, to get something sturdy.
    One could fit the edges with bushings and thus just screw the top on the rest.

    Alternatively one could could use foam-core, aluminium blended plates or alike.
     
  6. Rafal Lukawiecki

    Rafal Lukawiecki Subscriber

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    If you decide to ship your prints rolled-up, please ignore my post. Also, your needs may be different to mine, but when I ship my prints (mounted, unframed) I "build" a case from corrugated cardboard sheets for them, each time. It is easy and pretty quick.

    I take a stack of larger-size (maybe 26x30" in your case) brown, double-wall corrugated cardboard sheets, each about 8 mm thick, and each having its corrugation ("flute direction") at 90 degrees to the other one. In other words, I have two supplies of those, one corrugated lengthwise, the other widthwise, and the resulting stack is made from "opposing" ones. 1–3 sheets will become the top and bottom of the stack (1–2 for single print shipping, 2–3 for larger packs). Now, I cut an opening, using my mat cutter, in the remaining sheets, which will become the middle ones in the stack, the ones that will hold the prints. That opening is just slightly larger than the mounted prints.

    If your prints are unmounted, you may want to consider including sheets of mountboard or foamcore to secure them. When shipping prints for framing, I add foamcore between prints, to further protect them, and to ensure it has my stamp on the back.

    Each print gets wrapped in oversize, virgin-grade, heavy-duty polyethylene slip bag, and either it gets sealed, or simply folded and sticky-taped. Bagged print(s) lie in the openings in the cardboard sheets—in a way, the print is now in place of the piece of cardboard that has been removed earlier, and the board becomes a "frame" around the bagged print. The sheets get stuck to each other using double-sided tape, and/or with brown packing tape. Once the stack has been sealed, the whole lot gets wrapped in brown packing paper, and further sealed with more tape.

    This creates a surprisingly light yet pretty strong package, one which has survived long international journeys.

    I give credit to Anne Larsen and John Sexton for showing me their approach to print shipping and packaging, which I have only slightly modified (cross-wise interleaved corrugation) following a consultation with a local manufacturer of cardboard packaging, where I get the sheets from.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 7, 2014
  7. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    You may want to check the Uline shipping supplies catalog. Also artist's supply shops that carry portfolio boxes. I have used both types to send prints back and forth with no problems. I have a Pelican rolling camera case and it is quite heavy so something along that line may be costly to ship along with the initial purchase price. Uline has weather proof shipping containers and ones for art work etc. Their catalog is over 500 pages (uline.com phone 1-800-295-5510)

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  8. PKM-25

    PKM-25 Member

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    I ended up going with a Uline box for 20x24 and an Archival Methods 16.25 x 20.25 "Trans-Port" case which got a lot of praise from a friend of mine.

    I am super tight on space at home and my new office so I needed something re-useable for now. And yes, I agree with how Anne and John ship prints, I kept the box to my 11x14 I bought from them, will create a variation of it once I start mailing prints for sale.

    Thanks for all the replies folks, I hope I started a worthwhile topic for others to glean from.
     
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  9. Rafal Lukawiecki

    Rafal Lukawiecki Subscriber

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    You're welcome, and yes, I think you have started a worthwhile discussion, especially so in a subsection of APUG that does not get anywhere as much attention as, perhaps, it ought to.
     
  10. Tom1956

    Tom1956 Inactive

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    Duh... a plywood sandwich?
     
  11. PKM-25

    PKM-25 Member

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    The two solutions I came up with are a mere fraction of what that would weigh.
     
  12. AgX

    AgX Member

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    But what Tom and I suggested (including foamboard) would be stiffer on the two large planes.
     
  13. PKM-25

    PKM-25 Member

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    Yeah, but I don't have the means to make that, not in the dead of winter because I would have to do it outside, so I needed a turn-key solution and I have it all on order.
     
  14. PKM-25

    PKM-25 Member

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    This turned out to be perfect, very rigid and nice security, prints on the way to the spotter....